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The impulse to save our most cherished moments is a powerful force. When you ask people to choose three possessions to save from a burning house, one of the most common answers is a photo album.

Maybe that’s because photographs tell the stories of our lives – a timeline of memories filled with faces we love and places we have been. Photos speak directly to our emotions; they capture our attention and give us the power to show people who we are and what we do.

When composed professionally, they shine a light on our personalities, relationships, and families. After all, every human emotion has a place in photography.

Whether you need to steal someone’s attention with a stunning headshot or want to save your most loving family moments, I can help.

My name is Adam Chandler, and as a professional photographer in Johns Island, SC I delight in the adventure of photography. I constantly immerse myself in whatever genre I’m shooting and seek new ways of bonding with my subjects to provide them with a thoroughly enjoyable experience.

Unlike other photographers, I use my technical knowledge of photography, ability to connect with people, and artistic creativity to produce memorable photos for my clients. I believe that providing folks with a client-centric experience sets me apart from other photographers in Johns Island.

Some professionals may be wonderful composers but cannot understand what their customers want. Others are great at connecting but don’t have the training or experience to make their work truly special.

When you choose Adam Chandler Photography, rest assured that you are hiring a photographer with creativity, imagination, and a keen eye for detail. You won’t ever have to worry about sacrificing one quality for another.

I have a wide range of professional experience in the world of photography. I have had the pleasure of working with a variety of subjects, from local families to corporate business professionals in the Lowcountry. As a photographer in Johns Island with more than a decade of experience, my top priority is not only to capture beautiful images but also to provide you with a relaxing, enjoyable photography session.

Service Areas

Now that you know a little about my background, let’s take a look at some of my most popular photography services in Johns Island:

Our company mission is to exceed expectations

Your family is probably the single most important part of your life. From children to grandparents, and even nieces and nephews, building a strong family bond secures your legacy for the future.

You will grow and change with your family throughout life and encounter many memorable milestones along the way.  One of the best ways to document these milestones and relive your memories is with a family photo session.

I love family photography and strive to pour my soul and creativity into each shoot. While each session is different, I approach each one with the same goal: to capture the unique personality, affection, and energy of each family so I can provide authentic, engaging pictures and a uniquely fun experience.

Whether you have a newborn baby that you want to celebrate or have grandparents in town for a visit, Johns Island is an amazing city for family photography. There are so many locations in the Lowcountry that make for great family photography backdrops:

  • Beaches – Folly Beach, Sullivan’s Island, Kiawah Island, Hilton Head, Edisto Beach
  • Popular Places – Washington Square, Broad Street, Ravenel Bridge
  • Historical Sites – Johns Island Battery, Fort Sumter, Magnolia Plantation and Gardens, Rainbow Row

Whatever location you choose for family photography in Johns Island, the Holy City is a wonderful place in which to immerse yourself with friends and family.

As a family photographer in Johns Island, one of the reasons why I love working with families so much is the opportunity to get creative. I gladly accommodate the style preferences my clients are looking for – be it more traditional, posed images, or candid, playful pictures.

I use a relaxed style of direction to get your family engaged in our photography session, to help get authentic expressions that are full of life and happiness.

Here are just a few reasons why families choose Adam Chandler Photography for their family portraits:

Document Family Growth

With each year that passes, we grow – both literally in size and also in mind. Having annual family photographs helps document the advancements and growth you have in life. Family photography in Johns Island is a great way to remember the quirks or personality traits in your children, or to immortalize an important event like a high school graduation. Since we grow and change so fast, many families arrange for yearly family photo sessions to see their family’s growth year over year.

Remember Milestones

With each year that passes, new milestones are achieved. From a child’s first steps to a sibling getting married, there is no better way to remember such happy events than with photographs. Whether you are welcoming a new puppy into your life or just landed the job of your dreams, celebratory pictures of your family will give you heartwarming memories for the rest of your life.

Create Memories

The smiling, radiant face of your daughter after losing her first tooth. The loving glance between newlyweds. The happy father, beaming with pride after his son scored his first touchdown. As a professional photographer in Johns Island, SC, drawing out these feelings and emotions and capturing them on film is one of my greatest joys. Not because the pictures are great, but because you, as my client, will have so many years of enjoyment looking back at them.

Portraits and Headshots in Johns Island, SC

A great headshot shows you at your best – whether you want to impress a prospective employer or need professional photography for your website. In today’s world of digital dominance, having a professional headshot or portrait of your team is becoming a necessity. It’s no surprise, then, that headshots and portraits are among the most popular genres of photography.

Headshots can be tricky, mostly because many humans just aren’t very photogenic. I know that for some clients, it can be hard posing for a professional photo; knowing their headshot or portrait might make the rounds with future employers.

Fortunately, I have years of experience taking professional headshots. Unlike some amateur photographers, I know how to draw out your personality to capture you at your best. I know how to compose your portrait based on the industry you work in or the goal that you have with your photoshoot. Clients choose Adam Chandler Photography because I advise them every step of the way – from the clothes they should wear to the expression they should have.

A professional headshot or portrait is an investment into your personal brand, and here is why:

Show Your Personality

A great headshot can help give people an idea of your personality before you sit down to meet them. For instance, a serious glance at the camera might convey determination. A big smile may say “I’m approachable.” My goal is to match your expression with your personality with every headshot or portrait I take.

Show Your Professionalism

Clients, collaborators, investors, and employers are much more likely to interview you or call your business if you look professional. You have taken the time to invest in your brand, and the important people you’re sharing your headshot with will appreciate your effort.

Stand Out on Social Media

Many of my clients make appointments for headshots and portraits when they want to stand out from the crowd on social media. Whether you own a business and need to create new social media pages or you are looking to network with recruiters on LinkedIn, a headshot lends an air of professionalism that you won’t get with a selfie.

Show Off Your Current Look

Having outdated headshots can send a message of inauthenticity. When you have up to date headshots, you’re showing clients and employers that you are confident, committed, and authentic.

Qualities of a Great Photographer in Johns Island, SC

Being a great photographer means more than owning the best pieces of camera equipment. While a great camera gives clients the clearest, highest quality photos available, it won’t help me connect with my subjects. I strive to give clients a fun, enjoyable photo session. I use my knowledge and experience to help set up the perfect shot. After connecting with my client, I draw out their personality to produce a stunning final product.

Clients choose Adam Chandler Photography because I am different from my peers in the best ways possible. Here are just a few qualities that my clients appreciate:

Imagination

I consider photography to be an artform – one that requires a creative mind and heaps of imagination. A great photographer needs to be able to take something ordinary and transform it into something beautiful. A back-alley puddle is about as mundane as it gets, but with the right technique and a little imagination, it can turn into something with much more substance.

Passion

This quality might seem like a no-brainer to most, but I can’t tell you how many times I’ve seen photography that is missing something. More often than not, the photographer isn’t passionate about the subject or model that he or she is photographing.

Patience

Patience is an essential quality for all great photographers. Some days, picture lighting won’t cooperate. Other days, it’s hard to get that big happy smile from younger clients. That’s why patience and flexibility are so important. As a professional with years of experience, I understand that I must have the patience to deal with whatever comes my way and the flexibility to make the most out of any situation.

People Skills

All photographers are created differently. Some photographers are more aloof and put in the bare minimum effort when it comes to speaking with clients. Others, like myself, relish the opportunity to talk with customers. That’s because interacting with subjects allows me the chance to see their vision and transform their idea into art. Talking with subjects lets me draw out their emotions and put younger subjects at ease. People skills are a must in this industry. Luckily for me, it’s one of my favorite parts of the job

Eye for Detail

As a professional photographer in Johns Island, SC I am meticulous when it comes to details. Every element of a photograph should be reviewed to ensure cohesiveness. You might think that a family photo session is cut and dry in terms of composition and detail, but all elements of a photograph must come together to convey the vision that my clients desire.
When you hire me as your photographer, I take all the following elements into consideration:

  • Composition
  • Lighting
  • Emotion
  • Storytelling

If you have a goal you want to construe with your photographs, helping you achieve that goal is often found in the details.

I am proud to say that I am very passionate about my work. However, I’m also passionate about giving my clients the most enjoyable, care-free photography experience possible. My passion drives me to work harder, push farther, and strive to be better every day that I wake up.

Adam Chandler

Ready to Get Started?

One of my favorite things to do is to talk to clients about their vision. If you are in need of professional photography, let’s talk today about what you have in mind. Whether you’re looking for family photography in Johns Island or want new headshots for your employees, I am here to help every step of the way.  

Latest News in Johns Island

Several upcoming covid-19 testing and vaccination sites available in Lowcountry region

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCIV) — DHEC has announced more upcoming covid-19 clinics and testing opportunities set up for the coming days. Events are planned in Charleston, Berkeley, Dorchester, Colleton, Beaufort, Jasper, Hampton, Allendale, Bamberg, Orangeburg and Calhoun counties. UPCOMING SCHEDULE: Monday June 21, 9:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m., Goose Creek Health Center, 106 Westview Dr., Goose Creek Monday June 21, 10:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m., Calhoun County Health and Human, 2837 Old Belleville Road, St. Matthew...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCIV) — DHEC has announced more upcoming covid-19 clinics and testing opportunities set up for the coming days.

Events are planned in Charleston, Berkeley, Dorchester, Colleton, Beaufort, Jasper, Hampton, Allendale, Bamberg, Orangeburg and Calhoun counties.

UPCOMING SCHEDULE:

Monday June 21, 9:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m., Goose Creek Health Center, 106 Westview Dr., Goose Creek

Monday June 21, 10:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m., Calhoun County Health and Human, 2837 Old Belleville Road, St. Matthews

Tuesday June 22, 10:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m., Charleston First Assembly, 2957 Savannah Highway, Charleston

Tuesday June 22, 10:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m., Hampton County Health Department, 531 West Carolina Avenue, Varnville

Wednesday June 23, 10:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m., Bamberg County Health Department, 370 Log Branch Road, Bamberg

Wednesday June 23, 4 p.m. – 7 p.m., Brewlab, 2200 Heriot Street, Charleston

Thursday June 24, 10 a.m. – 3:30 p.m., Orangeburg County Health Department, 1550 Carolina Avenue, Orangeburg

Friday June 25, 9:30 a.m.- 3:30 p.m., Mt. Pleasant Health Clinic, 1189 Sweetgrass Basket Parkway- Suite 100, Mt. Pleasant

Friday June 25, 10:00 a.m.- 3:30 p.m., Bluffton Health Clinic, 4819 Bluffton Parkway- Suite 132, Bluffton, SC

Friday June 25, 4 p.m. – 7 p.m., Cooper River Brewing, 2201 Mechanic Street B, Charleston

Friday June 25, 3 p.m. – 6 p.m., Low Tide Brewing, 2863 Maybank Highway, Johns Island

Community Partner Vaccine Clinics

Some non-DHEC vaccine providers may ask for your insurance information or an identification card, but you are not required to provide these in order to receive your vaccine and cannot be turned away. To make your appointment with a non-DHEC clinic, register online with the provider or call the provider directly.

Monday, June 21, 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m., Family Health Centers, Inc., Senior Recreation and Leisure Center, 220 Park Street, Neeses

Monday, June 21, 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m., Family Health Centers, Inc., New Mt. Zion Baptist Church, 1785 Amelia Street, Orangeburg

Tuesday, June 22, 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m., Family Health Centers, Inc., Orangeburg City Gym, 410 Broughton Street, Orangeburg

Tuesday, June 22, 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m., Family Health Centers, Inc., Mt. Olive Baptist Church, 678 Olive Drive, Cordova

Wednesday, June 23, 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m., Family Health Centers, Inc., Denmark Train Depot, 12 Baruch Street, Denmark

Wednesday, June 23, 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m., Family Health Centers, Inc., Holly Hill Depot, 8603 Old State Road, Holly Hill

Thursday, June 24, 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m., Family Health Centers, Inc., Orangeburg County Fairgrounds, 350 Magnolia Street, Orangeburg

Thursday, June 24, 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m., Family Health Centers, Inc., Holly Hill Depot, 8603 Old State Road, Holly Hill

Friday, June 25, 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m., Family Health Centers, Inc., Saint Mark United Methodist Church, 8502 North Road, North

Friday, June 25, 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m., Family Health Centers, Inc., Union Baptist Church, 16494 Ehrhardt Road, Bamberg

Saturday, June 26, 8:30 a.m. – 1 p.m., Family Health Centers, Inc., Ness Sports Complex, 381 Rhoad Park Street, Bamberg

Free COVID-19 Testing

DHEC-sponsored testing is free and pain-free (oral or nasal swab). Find a free DHEC testing location near you at: scdhec.gov/gettested. Information for non-DHEC testing opportunities from community partners is available here: scdhec.gov/covid19testing.

There continues to be a high rate of COVID-19 disease transmission in communities across our state, according to DHEC. The CDC currently recommends these individuals to get tested for COVID-19.

People who have symptoms of COVID-19, regardless of vaccination status or prior infection.

Most people who have had close contact (within 6 feet for a total of 15 minutes or more over a 24-hour period) with someone with confirmed COVID-19.

oFully vaccinated people with no COVID-19 symptoms do not need to be tested following an exposure to someone with COVID-19.

oPeople who have tested positive for COVID-19 within the past 3 months and recovered do not need to get tested following an exposure as long as they do not develop new symptoms.

People who have taken part in activities that put them at higher risk for COVID-19, such as travel, attending large social or mass gatherings, or being in crowded or poorly ventilated indoor settings.

People who have been asked or referred to get tested by their healthcare provider.

Most current vaccine clinic information: scdhec.gov/vaxlocator

Most current testing site information: scdhec.gov/findatest

The Moderna and Janssen (Johnson & Johnson) vaccines are currently available for people 18 and older, and the Pfizer vaccine is for ages 12 and up.

COVID-19 vaccinations are free. You won't pay deductibles, co-insurance, or co-payments. DHEC says walk-ins are welcome at vaccine events. Appointments can also be made by calling 866-365-8110.

Letters: Sisters of Charity reaches $80M milestone

Watching ocean waves crash on the South Carolina shoreline leaving seashells in their wake and pipers scrambling on the sand, I am reminded that everything has a place and a function in God’s world. Looking back over the 25 years I have served as president and CEO of the Sisters of Charity Foundation of South Carolina, I see similarities between the ocean and our philanthropic ecosystem. To succeed, we rely on the assistance of volunteers, board members, community leaders, staff members and grantees. We all play a role....

Watching ocean waves crash on the South Carolina shoreline leaving seashells in their wake and pipers scrambling on the sand, I am reminded that everything has a place and a function in God’s world.

Looking back over the 25 years I have served as president and CEO of the Sisters of Charity Foundation of South Carolina, I see similarities between the ocean and our philanthropic ecosystem.

To succeed, we rely on the assistance of volunteers, board members, community leaders, staff members and grantees. We all play a role.

In addition to marking our 25th anniversary, the foundation reached a significant milestone this month, meeting the $80 million mark in grants awarded.

These dollars have helped more than 3,000 organizations in all of the state’s 46 counties.

We also have partnered with other funding organizations and government agencies to leverage our grant dollars to bring another $42 million into the state in support of the foundation’s work.

Sisters of Charity has aided grantee partners during the most trying times of South Carolina’s recent history, including the 1,000-year flood, the Emanuel AME Church shooting and the COVID-19 pandemic.

Our staff has had the blessing of meeting thousands of state nonprofit leaders who are carrying out the Sisters’ mission through our grant funding by serving the most marginalized and vulnerable with humble hearts and steadfast determination.

Like the waves, we will remain constant to our mission of strategically using resources to reduce poverty through the action, advocacy and leadership of the Sisters of Charity of St. Augustine for many more years to come.

TOM KEITH

President and CEO

Sisters of Charity Foundation of SC

Middleburg Drive

Columbia

I want to thank Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., for standing up for our country and for seeing the big picture on what makes our country great.

If Democratic senators are able to remove the filibuster from the rules of the Senate, we will truly be on a path to losing our republic.

Thank you, Sen. Manchin, for standing up and following your heart.

I remember the following saying by the late President Ronald Reagan:

“Freedom is a fragile thing and it’s never more than one generation away from extinction. It is not ours by way of inheritance; it must be fought for and defended constantly by each generation, for it comes only once to a people. And those in world history who have known freedom and then lost it have never known it again.”

JOE MAYO

Gunnison Street

Mount Pleasant

As many of us begin thinking about the return to “normal,” the long-term impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic will affect all of us for years to come.

Health care providers are no exception.

For specialty providers like physical and occupational therapists, the pandemic caused patient volume to plummet.

Data shows that physical therapy saw a 34% drop in Medicare spending between January and June 2020, while the challenges of safely providing care caused costs to rise.

If that wasn’t bad enough, federal health policy is dealing another blow by advancing devastating Medicare cuts that threaten to limit patient access and harm the sustainability of the health care system.

Congress must step in to stop more Medicare cuts to specialty care before it’s too late.

Health care providers and seniors are counting on them.

DANELLE LOUDER

Bienville Road

North Charleston

The front page of the Monday Post and Courier reiterates our ongoing flooding problem. Right next to it is an article about adding more housing on some lots.

Covering land is one of the major problems that adds to flooding in our area.

HARRIET PRATT

Ravens View

Johns Island

Greg Estevez will delve into finding Edisto Island African American ancestors as part of the celebration and recognition of Juneteenth, which celebrates slaves being freed by President Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation.

Estevez is a direct descendant of the family who owned the Hutchinson House, the oldest house on Edisto Island associated with the black community after the Civil War. It was the residence of Henry Hutchinson, a freed slave.

Estevez is also the author of “Edisto Island: The African American Journey” and a board member of the Edisto Island Museum.

His talk, “Finding Our Edisto Island Ancestors,” will be 2-4 p.m. Saturday at the New First Baptist Church Fellowship Hall on Edisto Island.

For more information, call 904-386-1274.

JIM WENTHE

Russell Creek Road

Edisto Island

MUSC's first humanities scholar honored for career's work

Looking back over his life’s work, which has taken him from the University of California Santa Cruz, where he was the first Black faculty member and founding provost of Oakes College, to the Medical University of South Carolina, where he was the first humanities scholar in residence, J. Herman Blake, Ph.D., sees as the common thread that he was always “seeking to build a sense of community.” Now, the American Sociological Association is honoring him...

Looking back over his life’s work, which has taken him from the University of California Santa Cruz, where he was the first Black faculty member and founding provost of Oakes College, to the Medical University of South Carolina, where he was the first humanities scholar in residence, J. Herman Blake, Ph.D., sees as the common thread that he was always “seeking to build a sense of community.”

Now, the American Sociological Association is honoring him with its Distinguished Career Award for the Practice of Sociology.

“When I think about where I started, what I wanted to do, what I ended up doing, I’m overwhelmed. Overwhelmed,” he said.

Lisa Kerr, Ph.D., director of the MUSC Office of Humanities, was pleased to learn of the honor for Blake. She said Blake became a mentor in the humanities for her during the time he worked at MUSC.

“He was incredibly humble given all of the leadership positions he’d held, all the accolades he’s received over the years. You would not know his accomplishments from interacting with him,” she said.

Blake was born and raised in New York but had family roots on Johns Island. He served as a medic in the U.S. Army, then attended New York University, where he intended to study social work. Instead, he became fascinated by the study of sociology and wanted a “life of the mind.” After graduating in 1960 with a bachelor’s degree, he went on to the University of California at Berkeley, where he earned his doctorate in sociology.

From there, he joined the faculty of UC Santa Cruz (UCSC), which, at the time, was a relatively new institution within the University of California system. UCSC modeled itself after the residential college system at the U.K.’s Oxford University, and Blake became instrumental in the founding of the university’s seventh college, later named Oakes College.

He and the other founding faculty members had a vision for a college committed to liberal education and high standards that would have a diverse faculty and recruit from all underrepresented groups, including ethnic minorities, low-income students and women. It was a continuation of his commitment to undergraduate education that began while he was still at Berkeley and teaching part-time in the Bay Area. Decades later, one of his students honored Blake on the floor of the U.S. House for that commitment.

“He saw something in me that I did not see,” said California Rep. Barbara Lee. “He was patient and kind, but he was determined to push my intellect and help me understand I could achieve the American dream regardless of the difficulties I faced as a young single mother on public assistance. For that, I am forever grateful.”

It was while at UCSC that Blake began his long professional association with the Sea Islands of South Carolina and Georgia. In 1967, the Schwarzhaupt Foundation, which was funding Septima Clark’s citizenship school program on Johns Island, asked Blake to visit the island and assess the school’s work. Blake stayed with family on the island and began his lifelong foray into the history and customs of the Gullah Geechee community.

He regularly visited and began bringing his UCSC students to spend summers living and working within the community. While here, he would often visit Moving Star Hall, one of the few remaining local praise houses in the Lowcountry. Praise houses, he explained, date to the times of slavery. They were small buildings where enslaved people could worship without oversight. These weren’t traditional European church services led by a minister; instead they were gatherings where people might sing, testify or offer a prayer. Moving Star Hall still stands on Johns Island, though it has been converted to a chapel. Nonetheless, the small white wooden building is a powerful symbol.

“It is a signal, central element of Gullah Geechee culture. When you see this place, hardly any sign, nothing ‘distinctive’ about it, you realize you’re at one of the most sacred places on this island,” he said.

His first, brief association with MUSC came during this time when he was invited to be a keynote speaker during a conference involving MUSC and the Johns Island community. The event had been organized to improve relations and to see how MUSC could become more involved in community health issues.

Blake researched and wrote a paper about community perspectives on health – and highlighted how community perspectives differed from the medical university’s perspective.

“As my own uncle once said to me, ‘Every sick ain’t for tell the doctor,’” Blake said. “You don’t tell the doctor about your illness.”

Blake remained at UCSC for 18 years before moving on to Tougaloo College in Mississippi, Swathmore College, Indiana University, Iowa State University and the Sea Islands Institute at the University of South Carolina Beaufort.

He had retired to Johns Island when MUSC came calling. John Raymond, M.D., provost and vice president for Academic Affairs, invited Blake to become the university’s first humanities scholar in residence in 2007. The position came with a broad mandate to “enhance the humanities perspective at MUSC.”

“John Raymond gave me a set of keys and an office and left it to me to figure out how to make it work,” Blake said.

He began by meeting with every dean, many of the department chairs and hospital leaders as well as attending grand rounds and becoming familiar with existing programs.

“My goal was to ‘listen eloquently’ for the manifestation of a ‘humanities presence’ in every setting,” he explained. “I became keenly aware that there was a strong interest in the humanities throughout MUSC, but the heavy time demands of the existing units and programs indicated the best approach was to augment and strengthen every humanities perspective in every unit or program, rather than increase their time demands.”

“My goal was to ‘listen eloquently’ for the manifestation of a ‘humanities presence’ in every setting."

J. Herman Blake, Ph.D.

Blake became involved in making presentations to both faculty and staff. Over his eight years at MUSC, he regularly made presentations to second-year dental students; presented to medical students on ethics, end-of-life care and the fundamentals of patient care; brought in speakers for grand rounds; and co-published a paper in the journal Thoracic Surgery Clinics with MUSC pediatric cardiac surgeon Robert Sade, M.D., and lawyer Mary Kay Schwemmer of the Charleston School of Law, highlighting how telemedicine has changed the way that patients and surgeons communicate.

When Kerr met Blake, she was working in the Center for Academic Excellence and the Writing Center. They collaborated for several years, along with colleagues from the College of Charleston, Trident Technical College and Charleston School of Law, to organize a book club focused on health and health care issues.

“The idea was to engage the MUSC community with the larger community – Herman was very focused on involving the community,” Kerr said.

He also encouraged her in her career. She remembers a lunch conversation with him shortly before he retired from MUSC. At the time, she was about to become chair of the University Humanities Committee, but she felt, as did many of her predecessors, that something more permanent should be in place.

“He was the one at that lunch who said, ‘Have a plan, think about what you want.’ And I ultimately came up with a proposal for the Office of Humanities,” she said.

While at MUSC, Blake was also able to incorporate the work he had done in the Sea Islands during his time at UCSC, utilizing, for instance, oral histories he had taken from residents. One of the most meaningful to him was that of a woman whose father had been enslaved and sold away three times. She spoke of how they searched for each other after the Civil War.

“When you have those accounts, those narratives, and when you can play the tape, it’s a way of impressing upon medical professionals the importance of not only being professional but being caring. That's what I did,” he said.

After Blake left MUSC in 2015, he became executive director of the Gullah Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor Commission until 2017. He now lives in the Lowcountry with his wife, Emily L. Moore, Ed.D., former associate dean for academic and faculty affairs in the MUSC College of Health Professions.

The American Sociological Association is presenting its awards during a virtual annual meeting in August.

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Letters: Charleston County’s recent payouts are costly

In 2012, then-Reps. Chip Limehouse and Bobby Harrell told Charleston County Council that if it canceled the I-526 extension project, the county would owe the S.C. Department of Transportation about $11.5 million for money already spent on the project. County Council members Teddie Pryor and Elliott Summey told the public that the county would go bankrupt having to pay out that cancellation money unless the decision to proceed was taken. About half of that amount was recoverable right-of-way land purchases, the remainder was eng...

In 2012, then-Reps. Chip Limehouse and Bobby Harrell told Charleston County Council that if it canceled the I-526 extension project, the county would owe the S.C. Department of Transportation about $11.5 million for money already spent on the project.

County Council members Teddie Pryor and Elliott Summey told the public that the county would go bankrupt having to pay out that cancellation money unless the decision to proceed was taken.

About half of that amount was recoverable right-of-way land purchases, the remainder was engineering fees and other expenses. The county would have been out about $5 million to $6 million.

This was not an inconsequential amount, but a minuscule fraction of the hundreds of millions the county then decided to commit to the project.

Fast forward several years and Charleston County has paid out $33 million to extricate itself from the failed Naval Hospital deal as well as $10 million, including $2 million from insurance, in the death of Jamal Sutherland.

Apparently, the county is so well set that there is no problem paying.

What has changed in these past few years where dropping tens of millions of dollars is no big deal?

Is Charleston County so well off that council believes it can just throw huge piles of our money at problems to make them go away?

Do we have any insights into the financial accounting behind these decisions, or are all these aspects only able to be discussed in closed sessions?

Perhaps if there is so much extra cash in the county bank accounts, council needs to consider a tax rollback or rebates, along with tighter oversight of problematic situations that could cause these big payouts.

RICH THOMAS

Betsy Kerrison Parkway

Johns Island

University of South Carolina President Bob Caslen has resigned after missteps during his job confirmation process, gaffes and plagiarism charges made while giving the commencement address.

If his name were Joe Biden, instead of resigning, he would have been elected president of the United States.

ELOISE SILLS

Ashley Villa Circle

Charleston

By all accounts, the regulations regarding our election process are in flux.

I am concerned about this because we need the selection of our South Carolina Election Commission members to remain as nonpartisan as possible.

This is the only way we will be able to trust our election results.

South Carolinians can be proud that our electoral process proved to be safe and fair during the most recent election.

And I, for one, want to keep the operation of our elections neutral and nonpartisan.

ELIZABETH “BUZZY” ADAMS

West Branch Avenue

Newry

I received the South Carolina Hurricane Guide in the Sunday edition of The Post and Courier.

I did notice something unusual: There is no mention of any lane reversals in place for the Lowcountry.

Last year, the governor decided to move the lane reversals past Summerville.

This year, it’s not there, according to the guide.

On the website for the state, hurricanesc.org, it mentions that James Island, and no one else, can get on the reversed lanes at I-526.

On the Charleston County Emergency Preparedness site, users can click on the link for evacuation maps, but it takes you to sctraffic.org, where you can learn about your driving tests and other unrelated topics.

It doesn’t appear that the local and state hurricane preparedness agencies are on the same page.

I would really like to know more details about how to evacuate if and when the time comes.

MICHAEL PORTER

Westside Drive

Charleston

Our state, county and local officials have failed us with the horrendous traffic congestion on both Main and Maybank roads.

How many surveys and public meetings have to happen before something gets done?

Plans are drawn up but nothing happens. There is, however, no problem in approving more building plans from developers.

Another 4,000-plus homes have already been approved, which will add roughly 8,000 vehicles to Johns Island.

If there ever is a call to evacuate the island immediately, forget it. I would rather die in my house than in an endless line of traffic.

Our elected officials must start building the roads and bridges needed to deal with this increase of traffic.

Our officials are letting us down.

ROBERT MILLER

Acorn Drop Lane

Johns Island

What to do for the week of June 2

Johns Island Concert Series Part two of the concert series at Johns Island County Park is just around the corner, and this month you can hear the reggae sounds of Mystic Vibrations. Bring a few chairs, a blanket and anything else you may need, and grab some food from local vendors, including Happy Thai and Holy City Homemade Italian Ice. June 5. 6-9:30 p.m. Free to attend. Johns Island County Park. 2662 Mullet Hall Road. Johns Island. ccprc.com...

Johns Island Concert Series
Part two of the concert series at Johns Island County Park is just around the corner, and this month you can hear the reggae sounds of Mystic Vibrations. Bring a few chairs, a blanket and anything else you may need, and grab some food from local vendors, including Happy Thai and Holy City Homemade Italian Ice.

June 5. 6-9:30 p.m. Free to attend. Johns Island County Park. 2662 Mullet Hall Road. Johns Island. ccprc.com

84Flea
Drop by a community flea market hosted by Selective CHS and Red Rose Vintage. Shop from more than 35 sustainable vendors, includng Carolina Vintage, Cob’s Closet, Crash Course Vintage, Double Take 843, Ground Level SC and so many more with a variety of vintage clothing, jewelry and housewares. That’s not all — enjoy local craft beer by Tradesman Brewery, jam out to a local DJ and get your Sunday grub on with local food trucks, all in one place.

June 6. 12-6 p.m. Free to attend. Tradesman Brewing Co. 1647 King St. Downtown. tradesmanbrewing.com

Creative Corridors at Redux
The annual Creative Corridors studio art exhibition opened its doors June 1, giving an opportunity for Redux resident artists to showcase samples of their work. This year, the artists were asked to consider the community structure and interconnectivity of working out of Redux, as well as the nature of being a part of the greater creative community in Charleston.

June 1-July 13. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays; 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Fridays. Free to Attend. Redux Contemporary Art Center. 1056 King St. Downtown. reduxstudios.org

Happy Hour Outdoor Yoga
Take your Thursday happy hour to a new level with an all-levels outdoor yoga class led by Reaga Sobel Yoga in perfect time for great drinks and food from The Brewlab, an innovative, locally owned craft beer experience in Charleston’s brewery district. Bring your own mat, or purchase one on-site.

Every Thursday. 5:30 p.m. $10/person; $15/mat. The Brewlab. 2200 Hariot St. Downtown. reagansobelyoga.com

Virtual Book Club — The Shell Builders
Join author Colin Brooker, an architect and expert on historic restoration, as he discusses his book, The Shell Builders. The book explores thee rich history and building practices using tabby, a mixture of lime, sand, water and oyster shells seen in edifices throughout the Lowcountry and extending back in time with Caribbean, Spanish American and African roots.

June 3. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Free to attend. Drayton Hall Preservation Trust. Virtual. draytonhall.org

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