Family Photographer in Sullivan's Island, SC

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We've all heard the expression "a picture is worth a thousand words". And photos really are a special way to help tell the story of our lives - who we are and what's important to us.

And, of course, some images speak to us more strongly than others. More often than not we love a photo not so much because it shows us how we look but because it captures a very human element that is hard to express in words an authentic connection with those we love or with ourselves and how we show up or want to be seen in the world.

Whether you're looking to capture someone's attention with a professional headshot or want to commemorate the beautiful connection with your partner or family, I can help.

My name is Adam Chandler, and as a professional photographer in Sullivan's Island, SC. I truly find joy and fulfillment in the work I do. I love the adventure of photography and I continually immerse myself in learning and exploring how to improve my craft which includes learning new ways to connect with and capture my subjects. I truly understand that, for many people (if not most), even the idea of having your picture taken can cause a good bit of discomfort and anxiety. That's why I place so much importance on putting my subjects at ease while also really listening to any concerns or wants they have for their session.

I draw upon my technical knowledge of photography, my ability to connect with people, and my creativity to produce beautifully memorable photos for my clients. I believe that my unique creative vision and many years of experience combined with the way I strive to give my clients the most enjoyable experience possible sets me apart from some of the other great photographers in Sullivan's Island.

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Family Photography Sullivan's Island, SC  Photographer Sullivan's Island, SC

Testimonials

Now that you know a little about my background, let's take a look at some of
my most popular photography services in Sullivan's Island: My mission is to beautifully capture the joy and connection of each unique family while also creating a fun experience for my clients.

 Portrait Photographer Sullivan's Island, SC

The importance of family is hard to overstate. From children to grandparents to nieces and nephews, families and the family dynamic can grow and change before you know it, with many beautiful milestones taking place along the way.

I think that one of the best ways to remember some of these important moments of togetherness is with a fun family photo session.

I absolutely love photographing families and, while no two families are the same, I always strive to give each session my all in order to best connect with and capture the uniqueness of each family. Even though each session is somewhat different, I approach each one with the same goal: to capture the distinct personality, affection, and energy of each family in order to provide authentic, engaging pictures and a joyful experience.

Whether you have a toddler that you want to celebrate or have grandparents in town for a visit, Sullivan's Island is an amazing city for family photography. There are so many locations in the Lowcountry that make for great family photography backdrops:

  • Beaches - Folly Beach, Sullivan's Island, Kiawah, Seabrook, Isle of Palms, Hilton Head, Edisto Beach
  • Popular Places - Washington Square, Broad Street, Hampton Park, Waterfront Park, Shem Creek, The Cistern at College of Sullivan's Island
  • Historical Sites - Sullivan's Island Battery, Fort Sumter, Magnolia Plantation and Gardens, Rainbow Row

Whatever location you choose for family photography in Sullivan's Island, the Holy City is a wonderful place to explore and enjoy with friends and family.

As a family photographer in Sullivan's Island, one of the reasons why I love working with families so much (in addition to getting to meet some really awesome people) is the opportunity to combine my creativity with my ever-evolving technical skill. I also gladly accommodate the style preferences my clients are looking for - be it more traditional, posed images, or candid, playful pictures.

I use a clear yet relaxed style of direction to get you and your family engaged in our photography session, to help get authentic expressions that really show the unique dynamic and relationships of each family.

Here are just a few reasons why families choose Adam Chandler Photography for their family portraits:

Document Family Growth

Change, of course, is part of life and with each passing year families, too, change and often grow. Each stage is beautiful in its own way and having annual family photographs is a fun way to document the different seasons of family life. Be it a new baby, a birthday or anniversary or simply wanting to capture your kids at each special age, I'd be honored to be chosen to help tell the story of your family over the years.

Remember Milestones

With each year that passes, new milestones are reached. From a child's first steps to a sibling getting married, there is no better way to remember these wonderful occasions than with quality photographs. Whether you're welcoming a new puppy into your life, are celebrating an anniversary or finally have gathered your extended family together in one place, capturing these special times in your life is a great way to ensure you'll be able to enjoy and relive these moments years from now.

Create Memories

Many families tell me before their sessions that it's not often that they are all able to be together and they emphasize how special and important this session is. Or, perhaps, a mom or dad will talk about how fleetingly special a certain age of their child is and how they really want to capture their children's personalities. Even if you capture lots of great moments of your family throughout the year it's likely not very often that all of you are in the pictures at once (other than maybe having a stranger tell you to "say cheese" after you hand them your phone. Having a time that's dedicated to capturing the special bonds between family members - parents and their children, grandparents and their grandchildren, siblings and maybe extended family as well - is so important. We all know just how special these people and moments are and how we tend to treasure these memories more with each passing year.

Portraits And Headshots In Sullivan's Island, SC

A great headshot shows you at your best - whether you want to impress a prospective employer or need professional photography for your website. In today's digitally-intensive society, having a professional headshot or portrait of you or your team that stands out for all the right reasons is becoming a necessity. It's no surprise, then, that headshots and portraits are among the most popular genres of photography.

Headshots can be tricky, mostly because many (if not most) people don't like being in front of the camera (trust me, I totally get that). I know that for some clients, it can be hard to know what to do, what to wear or how to relax enough to let their authentic selves come through so that they can end up with a professional photo or headshot that inspires authenticity and confidence.

Fortunately, I have years of experience taking professional headshots of all types of people. No matter what your comfort level is with having your picture taken, I pride myself on being able to create the conditions necessary to help capture my clients as you want to be seen. Through lighting, posing and direct yet relaxed interaction I'll help guide you to great photos that you’ll be proud to showcase and share with others.

A professional headshot or portrait is an investment into your personal brand, and here is why:

 Portrait Photographer Sullivan's Island, SC
 Best Photographer Sullivan's Island, SC

Show Your Personality

Not all headshots should be approached the same way. Depending on your industry or how you'll be using the photos, there are certain things to consider. A great headshot reflects not just how you look but also how you show up in the world. It can help give people an idea of the kind of person you are before you sit down to meet them. Oftentimes, too, people may want a variety of "looks" to suit different needs and uses. My goal is to listen to your expectations and then deliver results that will serve you will in your professional and/or personal life.

 Beach Photography Sullivan's Island, SC

Show Your Professionalism

Clients, collaborators, investors, and employers are typically much more likely to interview you or to contact you or your business if you look professional. If you've taken the time to invest in your brand, in part by making the effort to arrange a professional headshot, people notice that. And who doesn't want to make a great first (or second or third) impression?

 Family Portrait Photographer Sullivan's Island, SC

Stand Out on Social Media

Many of my clients make appointments for headshots and portraits when they want to stand out from the crowd on social media. Whether you own a business and need to create new social media pages or you're looking to network with recruiters on LinkedIn or, perhaps, update your website, a professional headshot can definitely set you apart in the modern sea of selfies and snapshots that you often see out there.

 Wedding Photographer Sullivan's Island, SC

Show Off Your Current Look

None of us look the same as we did 10 or 15 years ago yet some of us keep the same photo up for decades. Having outdated headshots can send a message of inauthenticity. When you have up-to-date, professional headshots, you're showing clients and employers that you are confident, committed, and authentic.

 Headshots Sullivan's Island, SC

Qualities Of A Great Photographer In Sullivan's Island, SC

Being a great photographer means more than owning fancy equipment. While having expensive gear can be quite helpful, the real test of a professional, for me, has a lot more to do with being able to draw upon my deep understanding of the craft of photography so that I can focus more on connecting with and beautifully capturing my subjects without getting bogged down in figuring out the technical side of things. It's taken me many years to get where I am and I'm always striving to improve in order to continue to deliver the best pictures and most enjoyable experience possible for my clients.

Clients choose Adam Chandler Photography because my experience shows and they trust me to always give them the results and experience that they're looking for. Here are just a few qualities that my clients appreciate:

 Engagement Photography Sullivan's Island, SC

Imagination

I wholeheartedly consider photography to be an artform - one that requires lots of curiosity and imagination along with a good bit of technique. A great photographer knows how to get beautiful results no matter what the conditions or circumstances are and this only comes with experience and preparation.

Family Photography Sullivan's Island, SC

Passion

This quality might seem obvious but I can't tell you how many times I've seen photography that may be technically good but is missing something. My passion for photography largely comes from my passion for connecting with people in a way that helps them feel comfortable letting their guard down so they can enjoy the process. And this almost always leads to exceptional, authentic images.

 Photographer Sullivan's Island, SC

Patience

Patience can also be essential for great photos. As in life, there are many things that we just can't control. Sometimes the best photos come from patiently going with the flow and not trying to force something to happen. I find that when I'm patient yet prepared - ready to capture the right moment or expression when the time is right - that's often the best approach. As a professional with many years of experience, I understand the importance of having the patience to deal with whatever comes my way as well as the flexibility and preparedness to make the most out of any situation.

 Portrait Photographer Sullivan's Island, SC

People Skills

If ever there was a business where people skills were important I think portrait photography is definitely one of them. Knowing how uncomfortable many people can be when getting their pictures taken, I put every effort into helping ensure the best possible experience for my clients and communication is such a big part of that. I love interacting with my clients to build trust and rapport as well as a deep understanding of your expectations including any concerns you may have. As I've said, for me my job is not just about delivering beautiful images but also a wonderful client experience. That's why I focus so much on each and every interaction with my clients. Yes, people skills are a must in this business. Luckily for me, it's one of my favorite parts of the job!

Eye for Detail

As a professional photographer in Sullivan's Island, SC I am meticulous when it comes to details. Through my many years of photographing many different types of subjects under many different circumstances I've come to learn just how important details are. Whether it's finding or creating the best quality of light for my clients, eliciting a great expression or
adjusting the background or, perhaps, a piece of clothing, all of these things impact the overall look and feel of a photo. Whether I'm photographing a family, a business professional or a couple in love I always look for all the ways I can create the best image possible.

 Portrait Photographer Sullivan's Island, SC
 Best Photographer Sullivan's Island, SC

"As I hope you can tell by looking at my work, I really love my job. And most of all I love the people I get to meet and work with. I'd be honored and delighted to be chosen for your photography needs."

Adam Chandler

Ready to Get Started?

One of my favorite things to do is to talk to clients about what they're looking for and how I can serve them. If you are in need of professional photography, let's talk today about what you have in mind. Whether you're looking for family or couples' photography in Sullivan's Island or want great new headshots for you or your team, I'm here to help every step of the way!  

Latest News in Sullivan's Island, SC

The Co-Op Frosé and Eatery coming to Huntsville, first in Alabama

In 2016, Jess Patterson tried a drink that would change his future. At Bar Primi, an Italian joint on New York’s Lower East Side, he had his first frosé, a frozen wine drink.“It’s one of the few frozen drinks that is light and refreshing,” Patterson says now. “There’s not much sugar in it. A frozen daiquiri or a pina colada or margarita, those are all a little bit too sugary for me. And so we just sort of fell in love (with frosé), because of how light and refreshing it was.”...

In 2016, Jess Patterson tried a drink that would change his future. At Bar Primi, an Italian joint on New York’s Lower East Side, he had his first frosé, a frozen wine drink.

“It’s one of the few frozen drinks that is light and refreshing,” Patterson says now. “There’s not much sugar in it. A frozen daiquiri or a pina colada or margarita, those are all a little bit too sugary for me. And so we just sort of fell in love (with frosé), because of how light and refreshing it was.”

A former Wall Street trader, Patterson now lived in the Charleston, S.C. area, where in 2012 he started a small local chain of bodega-style delis called The Co-Op. Those businesses are all located right on the beach. Patterson thought adding frosé to their offerings - especially to-go, so customers take a cup to the beach with them - had possibilities.

Now, frosé, made in frozen daquiri machines, makes up around 30 percent of sales of The Co-Op’s first five locations, including the original in Sullivan’s Island. The business’ sixth location will open this week in Nashville.

In spring 2023, Patterson will open The Co-Op Frosé and Eatery’s seventh location, in Huntsville. It will be their first in Alabama. The shop will go into a space at The Village of Providence, the development located off University Drive at Providence Main Street. That area is already home to eateries like Phuket Thai Restaurant, Mellow Mushroom pizza, Taco Mama and local celebrity chef James Boyce’s Grille on Main.

The Co-Op’s most popular frosé flavors include strawberry, blackberry lavender, pear and mango. “I think we have between 40 and 50 different flavors,” Patterson, an Evansville, Indiana native, says. “In Huntsville we’ll probably have six machines and 12 flavors rotating per day.”

Their signature frosé size goes for around $11 and contains the equivalent of three or so glasses of wine, Patterson says. The Co-Op also does flights of frosé.

Most of the business’ sales comes from its gourmet sandwiches, including a California Turkey (with avocado, sprouts, bacon and tomato), and breakfast items, including a bacon, egg and cheese sandwich and an avocado toast. Breakfast items run between $4 and $8. Lunch items, $8 to $12. More info at thecoopsi.com. Patterson says The Co-Op’s hours in Huntsville will be something like 7 a.m. to 10 p.m.

Since Village of Providence is one of Huntsville’s city-sanctioned “entertainment districts,” Co-Op customers will be able to take their cups and perambulate around the development, which also contains retail and other businesses as well as hotels and homes. Patterson says, “We’re really trying to grow that happy-hour-and-on business.”

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How did SC get the Palmetto State nickname? It wasn’t just because there are lots of palmettos

Ever wonder how South Carolina came to be nicknamed the Palmetto State?While, yes, the state does have many palmetto trees scattered around the entirety of the state due to its large species population within the borders of South Carolina, this tree also has a historical significance to the state.The nickname is derived from South Carolina’s state tree, the sabal palmetto.Also called the cabbage palmetto, s...

Ever wonder how South Carolina came to be nicknamed the Palmetto State?

While, yes, the state does have many palmetto trees scattered around the entirety of the state due to its large species population within the borders of South Carolina, this tree also has a historical significance to the state.

The nickname is derived from South Carolina’s state tree, the sabal palmetto.

Also called the cabbage palmetto, sabal palm, inodes palmetto and the Carolina palmetto, the sabal palmetto was designated as the official state tree by Joint Resolution Number 63 all the way back on March 17, 1939.

This palmetto tree was symbolic toward the defeat of the British fleet at Fort Moultrie on Sullivan’s Island during the Battle of Sullivan’s Island. This was due to the fact that the fort was built from palmetto logs, which absorbed the impact of the cannon balls and would not shatter.

Hence, South Carolina earned its nickname: the Palmetto State.

The Battle of Sullivan’s Island was the first decisive American victory over the British Royal Navy during the Revolutionary War and took place on June 28, 1776.

“The ferocity of the British naval bombardment had no great effect on the fort. Sabal palmetto trunks embedded in deep sand proved pliable and sturdy enough, absorbing iron balls like a sponge,” wrote the National Park Service of the battle.

At the time, Charleston residents were unaware if the fort had been victorious against the British or if it had been captured following the Battle of Sullivan’s Island.

The fort’s commander, Colonel William Moultrie, had then sent a boat to inform the residents of the good news. Loud cheers were said to reverberate through the streets.

“The defense had been a major victory for the Americans in Charleston. General Lee wrote, ‘The behavior of the Garrison, both men and officers, with Colonel Moultrie at their head, I confess astonished me.’ Six days later the Declaration of Independence was signed in Philadelphia. Afterwards, the South Carolina General Assembly renamed the fort, Fort Moultrie, in honor of the commander of Fort Sullivan,” wrote the American Battlefield Trust.

As for the palmetto trees themselves, sabal palms are native to the southeastern parts of the country.

“The cabbage palmetto is found in the coastal plain region from North Carolina to Florida. The palm inhabits maritime forests, “islands” within salt and brackish marshes, and the edges of ponds. It is also a commonly planted tree in urban areas throughout South Carolina,” states the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources.

The palmetto tree can grow to a height of 33 feet tall and its leaves can grow to about 3 feet across. They are formed with a spongier, scattered tissue and more malleable cells than most other trees, which allow them to bend with the wind during major storms such as hurricanes and tropical storms.

In addition to their many other attributes, these trees flower during the month of July and can be quite fragrant, attracting many types of pollinators.

As for size, according to Plant Real Florida, the University of Florida conducted several age and growth rates of sabal palms, the preliminary results indicated that, under average conditions in the wild, these plants can require 10 to 15 years of growth or more from seed to the first sign of a trunk at ground level. After this initial growth spurt, the trunks will grow about 6 inches per year. Meaning, a standing sabal palm with 20 feet of trunk is at least 50 years old.

The palmetto tree can be seen as a figure of significance in nearly every aspect of the state’s inception. It has been adopted as the state’s nickname, is included in the state seal, is on the state flag, is in the Pledge to the Flag of South Carolina, and can be seen in everyday life while carrying on day-to-day activities within the state.

This story was originally published September 14, 2022 5:00 AM.

Labor Day crowds return to normal for beach businesses

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) — From the shops to the sand, leaders across the Lowcountry’s beaches said this is the first Labor Day weekend “back to normal” since before the pandemic.Sullivan’s Island mayor Patrick O’Neil said although the threat of rain resulted in a slightly quieter weekend than anticipated, local leaders are happy to see the Labor Day crowds return.“We continue, everyday, just to see exponential growth of the foot traffic that’s coming through,” s...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) — From the shops to the sand, leaders across the Lowcountry’s beaches said this is the first Labor Day weekend “back to normal” since before the pandemic.

Sullivan’s Island mayor Patrick O’Neil said although the threat of rain resulted in a slightly quieter weekend than anticipated, local leaders are happy to see the Labor Day crowds return.

“We continue, everyday, just to see exponential growth of the foot traffic that’s coming through,” said Kathleen Arnold, fine art consultant at Sandpiper Gallery on Sullivan’s Island. “The traffic is constant, back and forth. People walking to the restaurants, people heading to the beach.”

Arnold said in her experience, the tourism season on Sullivan’s Island typically lasts from May until Labor Day weekend every year. However, after seeing tourist travel ebb and flow “practically year-round” in recent years, she expects the season to last through October or November.

“People want to escape the hustle and bustle of life, so they come here,” Arnold said, attributing the steady growth of tourism to Charleston’s “small-town charm.”

Leaders at Folly Beach agree. Mayor Tim Goodwin said stores there are struggling to keep up with an increase of both foot traffic — and car traffic — from tourists and locals this summer.

“Sunday was a pile of people out here,” Goodwin said. “The first time this year we’ve seen traffic backed up as far as it was.”

Goodwin encouraged anyone heading to the water to use the free Beach Reach app. Created by the Berkeley-Charleston-Dorchester Council of Governments, the app provides live traffic cameras, maps and beach policies for three of Charleston’s most popular beaches.

The mayor said the biggest challenges facing store owners at Folly Beach are a lack of workers and employee burnout. As a result, some stores are struggling to keep their normal hours.

Click here to learn more about the town of Sullivan’s Island.

Photo essay: SC sea turtle advocates see their work pay off as nest counts go up

The endangered loggerhead sea turtle has allies on the sand. Despite historic trends of the species’ decline, the tides have been changing.The sea turtles take nearly 30 years before females can reproduce, making conservation efforts a long-term game. Conservationists have started to see a return on investme...

The endangered loggerhead sea turtle has allies on the sand. Despite historic trends of the species’ decline, the tides have been changing.

The sea turtles take nearly 30 years before females can reproduce, making conservation efforts a long-term game. Conservationists have started to see a return on investment after years of their efforts. They have seen increasing success rates of hatchings starting in the early 2000s, and spiked in 2014. According to seaturtle.org, this year’s nest count has already surpassed 2021’s nest count by over 2,000 nests.

This species, which is millions of years old, has been unable to adapt fast enough to rapidly changing environmental conditions and man-made dangers. Erosion on many of South Carolina’s coastal islands has vastly changed the landscape of many of loggerhead turtles’ most popular nesting grounds.

Jerry Tupacz, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife refuge specialist at Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge, has worked on these islands for over 17 years. He has yet to see the generation of turtles that he began working with in 2005 come back to nest.

“I’d like to think I’ll be doing this for another 10 years, but we’ll see,” Tupacz said. “In my mind, I’ll be coming back as a volunteer to see them.”

Tupacz claims that changing tides have greatly reduced areas of beach area viable for nesting on all the islands under his watch. “You don’t need big events to make this stuff happen. I watch almost 20-35 feet of beach lost every year,” he said.

Humans also pose a great danger to these turtles. Fishing lines and boat propellers make up the largest two human-made threats at Cape Romain, but light pollution on more populated beaches interferes with turtles making their way to the water.

“Humans are responsible for the devastation in the first place. If the humans won’t help them, the species will cease to exist,” said Michael Barnett, a frequent volunteer at Cape Romain and an avid conservation photographer with a large Instagram following.

During the six month nesting season, turtle specialists and volunteer patrols work tirelessly on beaches all along the coast of South Carolina. In recent years, volunteering in sea turtle conservation has become very popular.

Mary Pringle, the Isle of Palms and Sullivan’s Island Turtle Patrol project manager, said the group has 170, or “way too many”, volunteers, in addition to a lengthy waitlist. More remote and turtle-dense nesting areas often get less attention, volunteers and funding than groups that cover more accessible and people-heavy nesting beaches. This leaves staff at places like Cape Romain often overworked, but they still press on through the labor-intensive work.

“One of these days I won’t be so tired after I get off and I’ll go fishing,” Tupacz said.

LOWVELO gearing up to be the best event ever; Glow Blue activities to include mechanical bull

While he watched his mother fight cancer, Matt Miller of Greenwood, South Carolina, never knew he would end up in a similar battle. “I always remembered her saying ‘I knew I had cancer. I just went to the doctor for my diagnosis,’” said Miller. “I didn’t truly get what she was saying until I also knew for myself.”In late 2019, Miller was diagnosed with stage two colorectal cancer. Not long after, he underwent emergency surgery. “I was fortunate to dodge chemotherapy and radiation but was...

While he watched his mother fight cancer, Matt Miller of Greenwood, South Carolina, never knew he would end up in a similar battle. “I always remembered her saying ‘I knew I had cancer. I just went to the doctor for my diagnosis,’” said Miller. “I didn’t truly get what she was saying until I also knew for myself.”

In late 2019, Miller was diagnosed with stage two colorectal cancer. Not long after, he underwent emergency surgery. “I was fortunate to dodge chemotherapy and radiation but was forced to accept surgery as the only option to remove the mass,” Miller said.

This fall, his musical group, The Jake Bartley Band, will be headlining the LOWVELO finish-line block party. This annual fundraising event will be held on Saturday, Nov. 5, and 100% of the money raised by participants will fund lifesaving cancer research at MUSC Hollings Cancer Center, the only National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated cancer center in South Carolina. Participants can choose from four routes, stationary cycling, a virtual ride option or volunteering.

It’s a special time for survivors to gather; for Miller, this gives him a chance to support lifesaving cancer research following his own lifesaving treatment.

“Without organizations like MUSC stepping up through LOWVELO and connecting the funding dots, we would still be in the Stone Age of cancer research and treatment development,” said Miller. “LOWVELO is invaluable to those of us fighting.”

Hollings director Raymond N. DuBois, M.D., Ph.D., said this event brings together survivors, the community and Hollings researchers and clinicians in a powerful way. “Cancer touches everyone in some way. And this event is an opportunity for us to celebrate the advances we’re making and support research that will provide tomorrow’s cures as well,” said DuBois. “It’s so fun every year to see the excitement of the people who support us. It inspires us to work harder.”

An exciting addition to this year’s event is a Hollings rally line. Three of the routes will start at Brittlebank Park in Charleston and go past Hollings Cancer Center on Calhoun Street as participants then head to and across the Ravenel Bridge and through some of the most scenic areas of the Lowcountry. Another addition is a rolling lane closure throughout downtown and across the Ravenel Bridge, allowing riders more room and minimizing the impact on local neighborhoods.

“Similar to Charleston hospitality, there is really no route quite like the LOWVELO routes. They are so unique,” said Medalist Sports President Chris Aronhalt, who helps manage the event. “The scenic and breathtaking routes of LOWVELO take riders through the historic streets of downtown, across the famous Ravenel Bridge, through beautiful neighborhoods east of the Cooper River, into the Francis Marion National Forest and along stunning beach views on Sullivan’s Island and Isle of Palms. It’s a mix of all the best the Lowcountry has to offer.”

The LOWVELO fun starts this month with the annual Glow Blue Week, Sept. 19 to 23, held on the MUSC campus. Hollings Cancer Center will be lit up in blue all week long. Registration for the ride will be free, and the LOWVELO team will be handing out fun swag around campus. The week features a special glow-in-the-dark stationary cycling class on Wednesday, Sept. 21; participants can reserve their spots.

On Thursday, Sept. 22, LOWVELO team members will be on the MUSC Greenway with information, fun swag items and a chance to ride Bucky the mechanical bull from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. They also will be out there from 9 p.m to midnight.

On Friday, Sept. 23, the second LOWVELO as a Lifestyle Lunch and Learn will be held. Participants can join in person or online to hear from Sundar Balasubramanian, Ph.D., a world-renowned expert in yogic breathing and stress release. Also joining him will be a Wellness Center trainer who will teach mobility exercises.

On Friday, Nov. 4, the evening before the Nov. 5 LOWVELO event, there will be a packet pick-up party at Firefly Distillery. MUSC participants have two opportunities to get their packets at Hollings on Nov. 3: from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.

No matter how people choose to participate, everyone involved is invited to join in the block party at the finish line, with live music, food and fun to celebrate cancer survivors and honor loved ones lost to the disease. This includes volunteers. It takes more than 300 volunteers to make the event a success, so people are needed for a variety of positions, from manning a rest stop to being an event photographer.

Miller said participants can expect a diverse and entertaining show. He and The Jake Bartley Band will be playing everything from country to funk and dance tunes and are excited to be part of the big LOWVELO block party. Miller knows how very fortunate he has been and offered up some advice for others fighting cancer.

“Surround yourself with others that have fought and won and don’t be afraid to reach out to a counselor or therapist for help also,” he said. “Keep your head up! Just like me, you didn’t ask to be in the cancer club, but you’re here now and part of a group of fighters that are all fiercely cheering for you to win.”

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