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The impulse to save our most cherished moments is a powerful force. When you ask people to choose three possessions to save from a burning house, one of the most common answers is a photo album.

Maybe that’s because photographs tell the stories of our lives – a timeline of memories filled with faces we love and places we have been. Photos speak directly to our emotions; they capture our attention and give us the power to show people who we are and what we do.

When composed professionally, they shine a light on our personalities, relationships, and families. After all, every human emotion has a place in photography.

Whether you need to steal someone’s attention with a stunning headshot or want to save your most loving family moments, I can help.

My name is Adam Chandler, and as a professional photographer in Daniel Island, SC I delight in the adventure of photography. I constantly immerse myself in whatever genre I’m shooting and seek new ways of bonding with my subjects to provide them with a thoroughly enjoyable experience.

Unlike other photographers, I use my technical knowledge of photography, ability to connect with people, and artistic creativity to produce memorable photos for my clients. I believe that providing folks with a client-centric experience sets me apart from other photographers in Daniel Island.

Some professionals may be wonderful composers but cannot understand what their customers want. Others are great at connecting but don’t have the training or experience to make their work truly special.

When you choose Adam Chandler Photography, rest assured that you are hiring a photographer with creativity, imagination, and a keen eye for detail. You won’t ever have to worry about sacrificing one quality for another.

I have a wide range of professional experience in the world of photography. I have had the pleasure of working with a variety of subjects, from local families to corporate business professionals in the Lowcountry. As a photographer in Daniel Island with more than a decade of experience, my top priority is not only to capture beautiful images but also to provide you with a relaxing, enjoyable photography session.

Service Areas

Now that you know a little about my background, let’s take a look at some of my most popular photography services in Daniel Island:

Our company mission is to exceed expectations

Your family is probably the single most important part of your life. From children to grandparents, and even nieces and nephews, building a strong family bond secures your legacy for the future.

You will grow and change with your family throughout life and encounter many memorable milestones along the way.  One of the best ways to document these milestones and relive your memories is with a family photo session.

I love family photography and strive to pour my soul and creativity into each shoot. While each session is different, I approach each one with the same goal: to capture the unique personality, affection, and energy of each family so I can provide authentic, engaging pictures and a uniquely fun experience.

Whether you have a newborn baby that you want to celebrate or have grandparents in town for a visit, Daniel Island is an amazing city for family photography. There are so many locations in the Lowcountry that make for great family photography backdrops:

  • Beaches – Folly Beach, Sullivan’s Island, Kiawah Island, Hilton Head, Edisto Beach
  • Popular Places – Washington Square, Broad Street, Ravenel Bridge
  • Historical Sites – Daniel Island Battery, Fort Sumter, Magnolia Plantation and Gardens, Rainbow Row

Whatever location you choose for family photography in Daniel Island, the Holy City is a wonderful place in which to immerse yourself with friends and family.

As a family photographer in Daniel Island, one of the reasons why I love working with families so much is the opportunity to get creative. I gladly accommodate the style preferences my clients are looking for – be it more traditional, posed images, or candid, playful pictures.

I use a relaxed style of direction to get your family engaged in our photography session, to help get authentic expressions that are full of life and happiness.

Here are just a few reasons why families choose Adam Chandler Photography for their family portraits:

Document Family Growth

With each year that passes, we grow – both literally in size and also in mind. Having annual family photographs helps document the advancements and growth you have in life. Family photography in Daniel Island is a great way to remember the quirks or personality traits in your children, or to immortalize an important event like a high school graduation. Since we grow and change so fast, many families arrange for yearly family photo sessions to see their family’s growth year over year.

Remember Milestones

With each year that passes, new milestones are achieved. From a child’s first steps to a sibling getting married, there is no better way to remember such happy events than with photographs. Whether you are welcoming a new puppy into your life or just landed the job of your dreams, celebratory pictures of your family will give you heartwarming memories for the rest of your life.

Create Memories

The smiling, radiant face of your daughter after losing her first tooth. The loving glance between newlyweds. The happy father, beaming with pride after his son scored his first touchdown. As a professional photographer in Daniel Island, SC, drawing out these feelings and emotions and capturing them on film is one of my greatest joys. Not because the pictures are great, but because you, as my client, will have so many years of enjoyment looking back at them.

Portraits and Headshots in Daniel Island, SC

A great headshot shows you at your best – whether you want to impress a prospective employer or need professional photography for your website. In today’s world of digital dominance, having a professional headshot or portrait of your team is becoming a necessity. It’s no surprise, then, that headshots and portraits are among the most popular genres of photography.

Headshots can be tricky, mostly because many humans just aren’t very photogenic. I know that for some clients, it can be hard posing for a professional photo; knowing their headshot or portrait might make the rounds with future employers.

Fortunately, I have years of experience taking professional headshots. Unlike some amateur photographers, I know how to draw out your personality to capture you at your best. I know how to compose your portrait based on the industry you work in or the goal that you have with your photoshoot. Clients choose Adam Chandler Photography because I advise them every step of the way – from the clothes they should wear to the expression they should have.

A professional headshot or portrait is an investment into your personal brand, and here is why:

Show Your Personality

A great headshot can help give people an idea of your personality before you sit down to meet them. For instance, a serious glance at the camera might convey determination. A big smile may say “I’m approachable.” My goal is to match your expression with your personality with every headshot or portrait I take.

Show Your Professionalism

Clients, collaborators, investors, and employers are much more likely to interview you or call your business if you look professional. You have taken the time to invest in your brand, and the important people you’re sharing your headshot with will appreciate your effort.

Stand Out on Social Media

Many of my clients make appointments for headshots and portraits when they want to stand out from the crowd on social media. Whether you own a business and need to create new social media pages or you are looking to network with recruiters on LinkedIn, a headshot lends an air of professionalism that you won’t get with a selfie.

Show Off Your Current Look

Having outdated headshots can send a message of inauthenticity. When you have up to date headshots, you’re showing clients and employers that you are confident, committed, and authentic.

Qualities of a Great Photographer in Daniel Island, SC

Being a great photographer means more than owning the best pieces of camera equipment. While a great camera gives clients the clearest, highest quality photos available, it won’t help me connect with my subjects. I strive to give clients a fun, enjoyable photo session. I use my knowledge and experience to help set up the perfect shot. After connecting with my client, I draw out their personality to produce a stunning final product.

Clients choose Adam Chandler Photography because I am different from my peers in the best ways possible. Here are just a few qualities that my clients appreciate:

Imagination

I consider photography to be an artform – one that requires a creative mind and heaps of imagination. A great photographer needs to be able to take something ordinary and transform it into something beautiful. A back-alley puddle is about as mundane as it gets, but with the right technique and a little imagination, it can turn into something with much more substance.

Passion

This quality might seem like a no-brainer to most, but I can’t tell you how many times I’ve seen photography that is missing something. More often than not, the photographer isn’t passionate about the subject or model that he or she is photographing.

Patience

Patience is an essential quality for all great photographers. Some days, picture lighting won’t cooperate. Other days, it’s hard to get that big happy smile from younger clients. That’s why patience and flexibility are so important. As a professional with years of experience, I understand that I must have the patience to deal with whatever comes my way and the flexibility to make the most out of any situation.

People Skills

All photographers are created differently. Some photographers are more aloof and put in the bare minimum effort when it comes to speaking with clients. Others, like myself, relish the opportunity to talk with customers. That’s because interacting with subjects allows me the chance to see their vision and transform their idea into art. Talking with subjects lets me draw out their emotions and put younger subjects at ease. People skills are a must in this industry. Luckily for me, it’s one of my favorite parts of the job

Eye for Detail

As a professional photographer in Daniel Island, SC I am meticulous when it comes to details. Every element of a photograph should be reviewed to ensure cohesiveness. You might think that a family photo session is cut and dry in terms of composition and detail, but all elements of a photograph must come together to convey the vision that my clients desire.
When you hire me as your photographer, I take all the following elements into consideration:

  • Composition
  • Lighting
  • Emotion
  • Storytelling

If you have a goal you want to construe with your photographs, helping you achieve that goal is often found in the details.

I am proud to say that I am very passionate about my work. However, I’m also passionate about giving my clients the most enjoyable, care-free photography experience possible. My passion drives me to work harder, push farther, and strive to be better every day that I wake up.

Adam Chandler

Ready to Get Started?

One of my favorite things to do is to talk to clients about their vision. If you are in need of professional photography, let’s talk today about what you have in mind. Whether you’re looking for family photography in Daniel Island or want new headshots for your employees, I am here to help every step of the way.  

Latest News in Daniel Island

protection from Japanese privets

The Lowcountry is a popular place for transplanting people — and plants, too. But now Daniel Island has an unwanted guest, of the leafy type — Japanese privets. Ostensibly, Japanese privets (Ligustrum japonicum) make for excellent hedge plants because they grow so easily and rapidly. In reality, these bushes are an invasive species to South Carolina and have become a weedy pest, according to Clemson University’s College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences. The South Carolina Forestry Commission c...

The Lowcountry is a popular place for transplanting people — and plants, too.

But now Daniel Island has an unwanted guest, of the leafy type — Japanese privets.

Ostensibly, Japanese privets (Ligustrum japonicum) make for excellent hedge plants because they grow so easily and rapidly. In reality, these bushes are an invasive species to South Carolina and have become a weedy pest, according to Clemson University’s College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences.

The South Carolina Forestry Commission concurs that Japanese privets threaten native forests in the Palmetto State. The forestry commission strongly discourages the planting of the non-native species because it’s difficult to control and spreads aggressively.

The semi-evergreen, multi-stemmed shrub can grow 10 to 20 feet tall and 5 to 6 feet wide, with a growth rate of 25 inches or more per year. The glossy green, ovular leaves bloom white flowers in May that have a strong odor that can be offensive to some. From September to October, small poisonous blue-black berries mature with seeds that are disseminated by birds. The seeds are toxic to dogs as well as humans and so are the leaves in large quantities.

But that’s not all Japanese privets produce.

When Amy Slaughter moved from Fredericksburg, Virginia, to Daniel Island in June 2018, she felt an uneasiness. Something was taking her breath away and it wasn’t the picturesque coastal views of the island.

Every time Slaughter walked or biked around the island she noticed a certain bush that would quite literally take her breath away. She nicknamed it “death bush” because it felt like a squeeze on her throat to the point that it was restricting her airways.

Upon research, Slaughter discovered name of the bush is Japanese privet. Slaughter and her husband had two of the bushes removed from their property, but their neighbor has multiple bushes beside their house, 6 feet from Slaughter’s front porch, and next to the neighbor’s mailbox.

After seeing a pulmonologist to address her respiratory issues, she was diagnosed with asthma.

Slaughter, who is a non-smoker and doesn't have a history of asthma in her family, wholeheartedly believes she developed pulmonary problems in response to an allergic reaction from the Japanese privet.

After receiving this news, Slaughter emailed the Daniel Island Property Owners Association (DIPOA) in late February, notifying them of the plant’s adverse effects. The Daniel Island Architectural Review Board Administrator Mary Sutton responded a few days later in March with a solution.

After reviewing the state’s stance on Japanese privets, Sutton assured Slaughter that the plant will be removed from the approved list of shrubbery. Furthermore, the architectural review board landscaping projects will no longer permit the use of the plant.

Sutton noted all homeowners should submit all landscaping improvements to the review board for approval.

“By all means I did not want this to come across as a complaint or a slight on the neighbors’ choices for landscape,” Slaughter said. “... I hope it helps a few people eliminate asthma or allergies on the island and keeps things under control and better for our environment here.”

DIPOA Field Operations Manager Chris Hamil stated that those who have Japanese privet already planted will not be asked to remove or dispose of it.

Hamil noted that one way to stunt seeding is by pruning the plant prior to and during the flowering season. According to the S.C. Forestry Commission, hand tools and tree wrenches are effective in removing Japanese privets, especially when combined with chemical treatment.

Prescribed fire has not been shown to be an effective control method.

There is not a formal list of invasive or non-invasive species for parks on the island, according to Hamil. But he did note that, for the most part, native species make up the representation of the overall plant life.

Native species that can be planted as an alternative to Japanese privets are red buckeye, bottlebrush buckeye, beautyberry, spicebush, oakleaf or azalea species.

As for allergies, Hamil said unfortunately they do not play a part in the decision-making process because everyone’s immune system is different.

For more information on the DIPOA’s lawn and landscape standards, go to bit.ly/3wOLX4s.

2021 US Open golf tee times, weather forecast, odds: Bryson DeChambeau, Brooks Koepka not paired in first two rounds at Torrey Pines

The biggest individual beef in golf these days belongs to Americans Brooks Koepka and Bryson DeChambeau, who also happened to have won three of the past four U.S. Opens. The 2021 version tees off Thursday morning from Torrey Pines in San Diego, and golf fans were hoping those r...

The biggest individual beef in golf these days belongs to Americans Brooks Koepka and Bryson DeChambeau, who also happened to have won three of the past four U.S. Opens. The 2021 version tees off Thursday morning from Torrey Pines in San Diego, and golf fans were hoping those rivals would be in the same threesome for the first two rounds, but unfortunately not. Both are +1800 to win this week on the William Hill Sportsbook golf odds.

According to former PGA Tour player and TV analyst Brad Faxon, DeChambeau and his camp shot down the idea when it was presented by the USGA.

"More people are knowing about this little fight. It's kind of become a bit of a Vegas sort of situation here. I found out the USGA actually did call Bryson DeChambeau and his agent and asked them if they would be OK with that, and Bryson declined," Faxon said Tuesday on SiriusXM.

Koepka's and DeChambeau's feud made headlines as the result of a viral moment from the PGA Championship. However, Koepka, the 2017 & '18 U.S. Open champion, has said their feud is good for the sport.

"I think it's good for the game. I really do," he said recently. "The fact that golf's on pretty much every news outlet for about two weeks pretty consistently, I think that's a good thing. It's growing the game [with] the younger generation. I get the traditionalists who don't agree with it. I understand that, but I think to grow the game you've got to reach out to the younger generation. And I don't want to say that's what this is, but it's reaching out to a whole bunch of people. It's getting golf in front of people. I think it's good for the game."

DeChambeau will play in a group with reigning U.S. Amateur champion Tyler Strafaci (+75000 to win) and Masters champion Hideki Matsuyama (+3000), and Koepka with Justin Thomas (+2200) and Collin Morikawa (+2200). It's possible that DeChambeau and Koepka are paired either Saturday or Sunday if they are around the same score.

Betting favorite Jon Rahm (+800) goes out late Thursday (4:36 p.m. ET) with Patrick Reed (+2500) and Aussie Marc Leishman (+6600).

Because the tournament is on the West Coast, the first tee times are a bit later Eastern time than a usual tournament: 9:45 a.m. The last groups will go off at 5:42 p.m. ET. A West Coast major means prime-time golf on television: The Golf Channel and NBC/Peacock are sharing coverage this year.

The Farmers Insurance Open is played at Torrey Pines in late January each year and double digits under par has won it five years in a row – Reed at -14 this year. However, both the South and North Courses are used then and just the South Course for the U.S. Open. Expect a tougher challenge.

"They tend to have rain during the Farmers for a day or, whatever, and we're not going to have to worry about that so the golf course is probably going to be a little firmer and faster than what you see in January," said Darin Bevard, Director of Championship Agronomy for the USGA.

Weather-wise, it's San Diego in the summer, so it looks perfect: Mostly sunny each day with highs around 80 and lows around 67.

U.S. Open Tee Times (Eastern): Thursday, Hole No. 1 / Friday, Hole No. 10

9:45 a.m. / 3:30 p.m. – Sahith Theegala, Chino Hills, Calif.; Edoardo Molinari, Italy; Greyson Sigg, Augusta, Ga.

9:56 a.m. / 3:41 p.m. – Chris Baker, Brownstown, Ind.; J.J. Spaun, Los Angeles, Calif.; Fabian Gomez, Argentina

10:07 a.m. / 3:52 p.m. – Patrick Rodgers, Jupiter, Fla.; Robby Shelton, Birmingham, Ala.; (a) Pierceson Coody, Plano, Texas

10:18 a.m. / 4:03 p.m. – Russell Henley, Columbus, Ga.; Mackenzie Hughes, Canada; Harris English, Sea Island, Ga.

10:29 a.m. / 4:14 p.m. – Francesco Molinari, Italy; Henrik Stenson, Sweden; Shane Lowry, Ireland

10:40 a.m. / 4:25 p.m. – Matt Fitzpatrick, England; Tyrrell Hatton, England; Viktor Hovland, Norway

10:51 a.m. / 4:36 p.m. – Martin Kaymer, Germany; Webb Simpson, Charlotte, N.C.; Gary Woodland, Topeka, Kan.

11:02 a.m. / 4:47 p.m. – Tony Finau, Salt Lake City, Utah; Abraham Ancer, Mexico; Daniel Berger, Jupiter, Fla.

11:13 a.m. / 4:58 p.m. – Si Woo Kim, Republic of Korea; Kevin Na, Las Vegas, Nev.; Bernd Wiesberger, Austria

11:24 a.m. / 5:09 p.m. – Jimmy Walker, San Antonio, Texas; Ian Poulter, England; Ryan Palmer, Colleyville, Texas

11:35 a.m. / 5:20 p.m. – J.T. Poston, Sea Island, Ga.; Adam Hadwin, Canada; (a) Joe Long, England

11:46 a.m. / 5:31 p.m. – Luis Fernando Barco, Peru; Dylan Meyer, Evansville, Ind.; (a) Matthew Sharpstene, Charlotte, N.C.

11:57 a.m. / 5:42 p.m. – Mario Carmona, Mexico; Wilson Furr, Jackson, Miss.; Davis Shore, Knoxville, Tenn.

Thursday, Hole No. 10 / Friday, Hole No. 1

9:45 a.m. / 3:30 p.m. – Andy Pope, Glen Ellyn, Ill.; Brad Kennedy, Australia; Thomas Aiken, South Africa

9:56 a.m. / 3:41 p.m. – Yosuke Asaji, Japan; Marcus Armitage, England; Jhonattan Vegas, Venezuela

10:07 a.m. / 3:52 p.m. – Cameron Young, Jupiter, Fla.; Wilco Nienaber, South Africa; Guido Migliozzi, Italy

10:18 a.m. / 4:03 p.m. – Brian Harman, Sea Island, Ga.; Tommy Fleetwood, England; Matthew Wolff, Agoura Hills, Calif.

10:29 a.m. / 4:14 p.m. – Collin Morikawa, La Canada, Calif.; Justin Thomas, Louisville, Ky.; Brooks Koepka, West Palm Beach, Fla.

10:40 a.m. / 4:25 p.m. – Kevin Kisner, Aiken, S.C.; Billy Horschel, Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla.; Matt Kuchar, Sea Island, Ga.

10:51 a.m. / 4:36 p.m. – Max Homa, Valencia, Calif.; Xander Schauffele, San Diego, Calif.; Phil Mickelson, Rancho Santa Fe, Calif.

11:02 a.m. / 4:47 p.m. – Jason Kokrak, Hudson, Ohio; Cameron Champ, Sacramento, Calif.; Corey Conners, Canada

11:13 a.m. / 4:58 p.m. – Paul Barjon, France; Sam Ryder, Atlantic Beach, Fla.; Ryo Ishikawa, Japan

11:24 a.m. / 5:09 p.m. – Dylan Frittelli, South Africa; Martin Laird, Scotland; K.H. Lee, Republic of Korea

11:35 a.m. / 5:20 p.m. – Rafa Cabrera Bello, Spain; Adrian Meronk, Poland; Sung Kang, Republic of Korea

11:46 a.m. / 5:31 p.m. – Akshay Bhatia, Wake Forest, N.C.; (a) Andrew Kozan, West Palm Beach, Fla.; Alvaro Ortiz, Mexico

11:57 a.m. / 5:42 p.m. – James Hervol, Hopkinton, Mass.; Hayden Springer, Trophy Club, Texas; Roy Cootes, Rolling Hills, Calif.

Thursday, Hole No. 1 / Friday, Hole No. 10

3:30 p.m. / 9:45 a.m. – Zach Zaback, Farmington, Conn.; Steve Allan, Australia; Eric Cole, Delray Beach, Fla.

3:41 p.m. / 9:56 a.m. – Hayden Buckley, Tupelo, Miss.; Taylor Montgomery, Las Vegas, Nev.; Jordan Smith, England

3:52 p.m. / 10:07 a.m. – Chez Reavie, Scottsdale, Ariz.; Richard Bland, England; Troy Merritt, Meridian, Idaho

4:03 p.m. / 10:18 a.m. – Robert MacIntyre, Scotland; Victor Perez, France; Matt Wallace, England

4:14 p.m. / 10:29 a.m. – Tyler Strafaci, Davie, Fla.; Hideki Matsuyama, Japan; Bryson DeChambeau, Clovis, Calif.

4:25 p.m. / 10:40 a.m. – Adam Scott, Australia; Sergio Garcia, Spain; Bubba Watson, Bagdad, Fla.

4:36 p.m. / 10:51 a.m. – Dustin Johnson, North Palm Beach, Fla.; Rory McIlroy, Northern Ireland; Justin Rose, England

4:47 p.m. / 11:02 a.m. – Matt Jones, Australia; Brendan Steele, Idyllwild, Calif.; Cameron Smith, Australia

4:58 p.m. / 11:13 a.m. – Carlos Ortiz, Mexico; Zach Johnson, Cedar Rapids, Iowa; Lanto Griffin, Blacksburg, Va.

5:09 p.m. / 11:24 a.m. – Sam Burns, Shreveport, La.; Chan Kim, Gilbert, Ariz.; Thomas Detry, Belgium

5:20 p.m. / 11:35 a.m. – (a) Ollie Osborne, Reno, Nev.; Peter Malnati, Knoxville, Tenn.; Brian Stuard, Jackson, Mich.

5:31 p.m. / 11:46 a.m. – John Huh, Dallas, Texas; Johannes Veerman, Houston, Texas; Zack Sucher, Birmingham, Ala.

5:42 p.m. / 11:57 a.m. – Rick Lamb, Nashville, Tenn.; Michael Johnson, Birmingham, Ala.; Carson Schaake, Omaha, Neb.

Thursday, Hole No. 10 / Friday, Hole No. 1

3:30 p.m. / 9:45 a.m. – David Coupland, England; Taylor Pendrith, Canada; Wade Ormsby, Australia

3:41 p.m. / 9:56 a.m. – Tom Hoge, Fargo, N.D.; Bo Hoag, Columbus, Ohio; (a) Joe Highsmith, Lakewood, Wash.

3:52 p.m. / 10:07 a.m. – Erik van Rooyen, South Africa; Christiaan Bezuidenhout, South Africa; Charl Schwartzel, South Africa

4:03 p.m. / 10:18 a.m. – Garrick Higgo, South Africa; (a) Cole Hammer, Houston, Texas; Joaquin Niemann, Chile

4:14 p.m. / 10:29 a.m. – Lee Westwood, England; Stewart Cink, Atlanta, Ga.; Paul Casey, England

4:25 p.m. / 10:40 a.m. – Will Zalatoris, Dallas, Texas; Scottie Scheffler, Dallas, Texas; Jordan Spieth, Dallas, Texas

4:36 p.m. / 10:51 a.m. – Marc Leishman, Australia; Jon Rahm, Spain; Patrick Reed, The Woodlands, Texas

4:47 p.m. / 11:02 a.m. – Patrick Cantlay, Jupiter, Fla.; Louis Oosthuizen, South Africa; Sungjae Im, Republic of Korea

4:58 p.m. / 11:13 a.m. – Kevin Streelman, Wheaton, Ill.; Branden Grace, South Africa; Charley Hoffman, Rancho Santa Fe, Calif.

5:09 p.m. / 11:24 a.m. – Sebastian Munoz, Colombia; Rikuya Hoshino, Japan; Brendon Todd, Athens, Ga.

5:20 p.m. / 11:35 a.m. – Wyndham Clark, Denver, Colo.; (a) Matthias Schmid, Germany; Matthew Southgate, England

5:31 p.m. / 11:46 a.m. – (a) Spencer Ralston, Gainesville, Ga.; Dylan Wu, Medford, Ore.; Justin Suh, Las Vegas, Nev.

5:42 p.m. / 11:57 a.m. – Luis Gagne, Costa Rica; Kyle Westmoreland, Daniel Island, S.C.; Christopher Crawford, Bensalem, Pa.

Looking for the best picks against the spread, sharp action on the total and props you can take to the window? Join Jonathan Coachman on the Early Edge as he speaks with SportsLine's top handicappers to preview every day's biggest games. We promise to keep it short, sweet and to put some green in your pocket. Early Edge is under 10 minutes and in your feed every single day by 11 AM ET. Download right here or wherever you get your podcasts.

Charleston 9 Remembrance Ceremony set for June 18

The Charleston Fire Department will commemorate the 14-year anniversary of the loss of nine firefighters at 7 p.m. on Friday, June 18th, 2021. The ceremony will be conducted at the Charleston 9 Memorial Park, 1807 Savannah Highway. Members of the fire service and the community are welcome to attend while adhering to current Covid-19 recommendations. On Monday, June 18, 2007, the Charleston Fire Department lost nine brave firefighters while battling a devastating blaze at a furniture store. These heroes were memorialized on June 22, 20...

The Charleston Fire Department will commemorate the 14-year anniversary of the loss of nine firefighters at 7 p.m. on Friday, June 18th, 2021. The ceremony will be conducted at the Charleston 9 Memorial Park, 1807 Savannah Highway. Members of the fire service and the community are welcome to attend while adhering to current Covid-19 recommendations.

On Monday, June 18, 2007, the Charleston Fire Department lost nine brave firefighters while battling a devastating blaze at a furniture store. These heroes were memorialized on June 22, 2007. A procession of more than 300 fire engines, ladder trucks, ambulances, and command vehicles stretched approximately 7.5 miles (12 kilometers) and moved single-file along a route which passed each of the three fire stations from which firefighters were lost, as well as past the site of the fatal fire. Bystanders, police officers, and ATF agents paid their respects by saluting or holding their hands over their hearts.

The Charleston Fire Department continues to honor the "Charleston 9" by striving for excellence in fire service professionalism, leadership.

Those who lost their lives battling the fire are: Firefighter Brandon Thompson, Engineer Bradford "Brad" Baity, Captain Louis Mulkey, Engineer Mark Kelsey, Captain Mike Benke, Captain William Hutchins, Firefighter Melvin Champaign, Assistant Engineer Michael French, Firefighter James "Earl" Drayton

Standing Watch

Charleston Fire Department personnel will initiate a watch at the flagpole of the memorial park starting at midnight and continuing for the 24 hours of June 18th.

Schedule

Family members may arrive any time prior to 7 p.m. Limited seating will be available due to current social distancing recommendations, families of the fallen and past members of the CFD will be offered priority seating in the tented area. The public is invited to attend. The ceremony will begin promptly at 7 p.m. Members from the Lowcountry Firefighter Support Team and the Coastal Crisis Chaplaincy will be on site to offer support throughout the event.

Ceremony

The half hour ceremony includes:

Please visit www.charleston-sc.gov/C9 for specific details regarding the memorial event. The program will start at 7 p.m. and run until approximately 7:30 p.m.

Parking

Parking in the area is limited and carpooling is encouraged. The Memorial Park parking lot along Savannah Highway will not be available. Parking will be available behind the new Fire Station 11 (currently under construction) at 1835 Savannah Highway and at the vacant lot off of Wappoo Road near the West Ashley Bikeway.

Website Resources

More information, including watch details available at: www.charleston-sc.gov/c9.

National Fallen Firefighters Foundation (NFFF) Documentary: http://www.charleston-sc.gov/index.aspx?NID=986.

South Carolina’s nonpublic schools receive $39M in federal coronavirus relief

COLUMBIA — More than 100 nonpublic schools in South Carolina received $39 million in federal COVID-19 relief funding this week. The schools, including several in the tri-county area, were able to apply to receive the money as part of the federal Emergency Assistance to Non-Public Schools program. In total, the program, which was created as part of the Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act, provided $2.75 billion to nonpublic schools nationwide. The S.C. Department of Education ...

COLUMBIA — More than 100 nonpublic schools in South Carolina received $39 million in federal COVID-19 relief funding this week.

The schools, including several in the tri-county area, were able to apply to receive the money as part of the federal Emergency Assistance to Non-Public Schools program.

In total, the program, which was created as part of the Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act, provided $2.75 billion to nonpublic schools nationwide.

The S.C. Department of Education split the $39 million between 111 schools. The department gave priority to schools that had seen the most impact from COVID-19 and enroll low-income students, according to a S.C. Department of Education news release.

The money ranges from just over $1,000 for Our Lady of the Rosary Catholic School in Greenville to nearly $1.7 million at Carolina Christian Academy in Lancaster.

In order to qualify, the schools had to be nonprofit, are approved to operate under state law, existed and operated before March 13, 2020, and had not applied to or received a loan under the Small Business Administration’s Paycheck Protection Program on or after Dec. 27, 2020.

The money works very similarly to the federal COVID-19 aid directed to public schools throughout the state. The nonpublic schools are able to use the money for operations to help with their safe reopening, as well as addressing learning loss and supporting educational technology brought on by the pandemic.

The schools are also able to use the funds as reimbursement for coronavirus-related costs dating back to March 13, 2020.

“These funds were appropriated by Congress specifically to address the needs of our private and parochial schools who have faced similar challenges to our public education system,” state education Superintendent Molly Spearman said in the news release.

At $1.23 million, Pinewood Preparatory School in Summerville received the most funding in the tri-county area. It was followed by Charleston Catholic School with $971,791 and Bishop England High School on Daniel Island with $666,456.

Other area schools to receive funding include:

The federal COVID-19 aid was well received by private education leaders, including the Roman Catholic Diocese of Charleston, who have are involved in a lawsuit against the state for not allowing private schools to access public funds.

“Our nonpublic schools were integral to our continued recovery as a state and worked to meet the needs of their students to the best of their ability,” diocese Director Michael Acquilano said. “We hope to continue this working relationship with the Department as we all toil in the service of our beloved students.”

The state is hoping to receive another package of funding for nonpublic schools that would amount to $41.75 million for South Carolina. The U.S. Department of Education is still finalizing how those funds will be allocated to states.

Clarification: This story has been updated to clarify that the schools were able to apply for federal relief as long as they did not apply for or receive loans from the Paycheck Protection Program on or after Dec. 27, 2020.

Sapakoff: Mickelson’s PGA Championship is SC’s top sports event ever

Comparing sports at the highest levels is trickier than managing an iron shot in shifting winds that might come from the Atlantic Ocean or over salt marsh. Some parochial enthusiasts think they’re so superior. “Any game where a man 60 can beat a man 30,” late Brooklyn Dodgers manager Burt Shotten once said of golf, “ain’t no game.” Exception: When a man 50 given 200-to-1 odds (at best)...

Comparing sports at the highest levels is trickier than managing an iron shot in shifting winds that might come from the Atlantic Ocean or over salt marsh.

Some parochial enthusiasts think they’re so superior.

“Any game where a man 60 can beat a man 30,” late Brooklyn Dodgers manager Burt Shotten once said of golf, “ain’t no game.”

Exception: When a man 50 given 200-to-1 odds (at best) becomes the oldest major champion in one of the world’s oldest sports by beating a man 31 who has won two of the last four PGA Championships.

Then the magnificence is undeniable.

Drama.

Surprise.

International intrigue.

All with scenic seascape backdrops and on a venue Pete and Alice Dye made one of the most difficult on earth.

That’s why Phil Mickelson’s May 23 victory in the 103rd PGA Championship on Kiawah Island’s Ocean Course ranks as South Carolina’s top sports event ever.

Clemson’s football national championship wins in Miami, Tampa and San Jose, sure. And South Carolina’s baseball titles in Omaha, and women’s basketball crown in Dallas.

Coastal Carolina’s College World Series triumph was so amazing.

But try finding something more impactful on S.C. soil than the Phil fun.

Mickelson beating Brooks Koepka, under the circumstances, is bigger than any big football win at Clemson or South Carolina.

It’s comparable maybe to Hank Aaron and two Jacksonville Braves teammates breaking the South Atlantic League color barrier for S.C. baseball fans with an appearance in Columbia in 1953.

But bigger than anything that’s happened at Darlington or at the Family Circle Cup, or within John McKissick’s record-setting Summerville High School football career or the 1991 “War by the Shore” Ryder Cup at Kiawah.

PGA Championship TV ratings were up significantly but you don’t need streaming analytics to prove the transcendent nature of an old guy kicking butt.

This could be a huge moment for golf, which has done a nice job reaching out to a younger audience but also needs middle-aged and older people to come back to the game for ideal growth.

“I’ve had to work a lot harder to be able to maintain focus throughout a round,” Mickelson said just after winning his sixth major. “That’s been the biggest challenge of late.”

People of all ages doing all sorts of sports and non-sports things can relate.

As for the physical part, this is Lefty, a former pudgy guy national radio show host Jim Rome (among others) has enjoyed calling “Hefty” at every opportunity. The 50-year-old Mickelson at 6-3 and 200 pounds has a different diet and muscular legs he loves to show off while wearing shorts on the driving range.

Still, what are the odds?

Really astronomical.

With Las Vegas perhaps the best place to compare sports feats, here are some of the teams currently with Mickelson-like, 200-to-1 odds to win the college football national championship this coming season: Kentucky, Wake Forest, Illinois, San Diego State.

South Carolina is 100-1, or twice as likely to win the national title as Mickelson was to win the PGA Championship.

Super Bowl odds for the upcoming NFL season have the Detroit Lions at 200-to-1 to win.

If Phil can do it, so can Wake Forest and the Lions, right?

Or consider that Mickelson lately has been better known for acerbic wit than four straight days of good golf (for instance taking a jab via youtube at Matt Kuchar while driving up Magnolia Lane at the 2019 Masters).

He showed up on Kiawah Island at No. 115 in the World Golf Rankings (and left at No. 32), and was No. 66 at the end of 2020.

Phil in the top 10?

There were prodigy projections when Mickelson at his childhood home in San Diego began getting his game together at 18 months old, messing around left-handed as a mirror image of his dad. It proved true when Mickelson tore it up at Arizona State, and early in his PGA Tour career and while winning those first five majors with Tiger Woods consistently lurking.

But if it was astonishing that Julius Boros won the 1968 PGA Championship in near 100-degree Texas heat at 48, or that Jack Nicklaus – “Yes sir!” – pulled it off at 46 with a masterful Masters in 1986, or that a 43-year-old Woods won one for the ages at Augusta in 2019, Mickelson is here to raise us one.

The star of relentless needling during his practice rounds full of side-bet action, probably now gets in or near the top 10 on most golf fan lists of greatest players.

Dabo Swinney as an interim head coach led Clemson to a 2008 win over South Carolina at Death Valley. It ushered in a Tiger football stretch that includes two national titles and six playoff appearances.

A Steve Spurrier-led South Carolina team upset No. 1 Alabama in Columbia in 2010.

The Gamecocks’ stunned Duke in the 2017 NCAA Tournament at Greenville on the way to the Final Four.

Chris Evert, Martina Navratilova, Steffi Graf and Serena Williams won Family Circle Cups at Hilton Head or Daniel Island.

Johnny Mantz winning the first Southern 500 at Darlington in 1950 set the stage for Cale Yarborough, David Pearson, Dale Earnhardt and Jeff Gordon.

But for a sports event held in South Carolina, Mickelson’s PGA Championship story is the new leader in the clubhouse.

Follow Gene Sapakoff on Twitter @sapakoff

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