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The impulse to save our most cherished moments is a powerful force. When you ask people to choose three possessions to save from a burning house, one of the most common answers is a photo album.

Maybe that’s because photographs tell the stories of our lives – a timeline of memories filled with faces we love and places we have been. Photos speak directly to our emotions; they capture our attention and give us the power to show people who we are and what we do.

When composed professionally, they shine a light on our personalities, relationships, and families. After all, every human emotion has a place in photography.

Whether you need to steal someone’s attention with a stunning headshot or want to save your most loving family moments, I can help.

My name is Adam Chandler, and as a professional photographer in West Ashley, SC I delight in the adventure of photography. I constantly immerse myself in whatever genre I’m shooting and seek new ways of bonding with my subjects to provide them with a thoroughly enjoyable experience.

Unlike other photographers, I use my technical knowledge of photography, ability to connect with people, and artistic creativity to produce memorable photos for my clients. I believe that providing folks with a client-centric experience sets me apart from other photographers in West Ashley.

Some professionals may be wonderful composers but cannot understand what their customers want. Others are great at connecting but don’t have the training or experience to make their work truly special.

When you choose Adam Chandler Photography, rest assured that you are hiring a photographer with creativity, imagination, and a keen eye for detail. You won’t ever have to worry about sacrificing one quality for another.

I have a wide range of professional experience in the world of photography. I have had the pleasure of working with a variety of subjects, from local families to corporate business professionals in the Lowcountry. As a photographer in West Ashley with more than a decade of experience, my top priority is not only to capture beautiful images but also to provide you with a relaxing, enjoyable photography session.

Service Areas

Now that you know a little about my background, let’s take a look at some of my most popular photography services in West Ashley:

Our company mission is to exceed expectations

Your family is probably the single most important part of your life. From children to grandparents, and even nieces and nephews, building a strong family bond secures your legacy for the future.

You will grow and change with your family throughout life and encounter many memorable milestones along the way.  One of the best ways to document these milestones and relive your memories is with a family photo session.

I love family photography and strive to pour my soul and creativity into each shoot. While each session is different, I approach each one with the same goal: to capture the unique personality, affection, and energy of each family so I can provide authentic, engaging pictures and a uniquely fun experience.

Whether you have a newborn baby that you want to celebrate or have grandparents in town for a visit, West Ashley is an amazing city for family photography. There are so many locations in the Lowcountry that make for great family photography backdrops:

  • Beaches – Folly Beach, Sullivan’s Island, Kiawah Island, Hilton Head, Edisto Beach
  • Popular Places – Washington Square, Broad Street, Ravenel Bridge
  • Historical Sites – West Ashley Battery, Fort Sumter, Magnolia Plantation and Gardens, Rainbow Row

Whatever location you choose for family photography in West Ashley, the Holy City is a wonderful place in which to immerse yourself with friends and family.

As a family photographer in West Ashley, one of the reasons why I love working with families so much is the opportunity to get creative. I gladly accommodate the style preferences my clients are looking for – be it more traditional, posed images, or candid, playful pictures.

I use a relaxed style of direction to get your family engaged in our photography session, to help get authentic expressions that are full of life and happiness.

Here are just a few reasons why families choose Adam Chandler Photography for their family portraits:

Document Family Growth

With each year that passes, we grow – both literally in size and also in mind. Having annual family photographs helps document the advancements and growth you have in life. Family photography in West Ashley is a great way to remember the quirks or personality traits in your children, or to immortalize an important event like a high school graduation. Since we grow and change so fast, many families arrange for yearly family photo sessions to see their family’s growth year over year.

Remember Milestones

With each year that passes, new milestones are achieved. From a child’s first steps to a sibling getting married, there is no better way to remember such happy events than with photographs. Whether you are welcoming a new puppy into your life or just landed the job of your dreams, celebratory pictures of your family will give you heartwarming memories for the rest of your life.

Create Memories

The smiling, radiant face of your daughter after losing her first tooth. The loving glance between newlyweds. The happy father, beaming with pride after his son scored his first touchdown. As a professional photographer in West Ashley, SC, drawing out these feelings and emotions and capturing them on film is one of my greatest joys. Not because the pictures are great, but because you, as my client, will have so many years of enjoyment looking back at them.

Portraits and Headshots in West Ashley, SC

A great headshot shows you at your best – whether you want to impress a prospective employer or need professional photography for your website. In today’s world of digital dominance, having a professional headshot or portrait of your team is becoming a necessity. It’s no surprise, then, that headshots and portraits are among the most popular genres of photography.

Headshots can be tricky, mostly because many humans just aren’t very photogenic. I know that for some clients, it can be hard posing for a professional photo; knowing their headshot or portrait might make the rounds with future employers.

Fortunately, I have years of experience taking professional headshots. Unlike some amateur photographers, I know how to draw out your personality to capture you at your best. I know how to compose your portrait based on the industry you work in or the goal that you have with your photoshoot. Clients choose Adam Chandler Photography because I advise them every step of the way – from the clothes they should wear to the expression they should have.

A professional headshot or portrait is an investment into your personal brand, and here is why:

Show Your Personality

A great headshot can help give people an idea of your personality before you sit down to meet them. For instance, a serious glance at the camera might convey determination. A big smile may say “I’m approachable.” My goal is to match your expression with your personality with every headshot or portrait I take.

Show Your Professionalism

Clients, collaborators, investors, and employers are much more likely to interview you or call your business if you look professional. You have taken the time to invest in your brand, and the important people you’re sharing your headshot with will appreciate your effort.

Stand Out on Social Media

Many of my clients make appointments for headshots and portraits when they want to stand out from the crowd on social media. Whether you own a business and need to create new social media pages or you are looking to network with recruiters on LinkedIn, a headshot lends an air of professionalism that you won’t get with a selfie.

Show Off Your Current Look

Having outdated headshots can send a message of inauthenticity. When you have up to date headshots, you’re showing clients and employers that you are confident, committed, and authentic.

Qualities of a Great Photographer in West Ashley, SC

Being a great photographer means more than owning the best pieces of camera equipment. While a great camera gives clients the clearest, highest quality photos available, it won’t help me connect with my subjects. I strive to give clients a fun, enjoyable photo session. I use my knowledge and experience to help set up the perfect shot. After connecting with my client, I draw out their personality to produce a stunning final product.

Clients choose Adam Chandler Photography because I am different from my peers in the best ways possible. Here are just a few qualities that my clients appreciate:

Imagination

I consider photography to be an artform – one that requires a creative mind and heaps of imagination. A great photographer needs to be able to take something ordinary and transform it into something beautiful. A back-alley puddle is about as mundane as it gets, but with the right technique and a little imagination, it can turn into something with much more substance.

Passion

This quality might seem like a no-brainer to most, but I can’t tell you how many times I’ve seen photography that is missing something. More often than not, the photographer isn’t passionate about the subject or model that he or she is photographing.

Patience

Patience is an essential quality for all great photographers. Some days, picture lighting won’t cooperate. Other days, it’s hard to get that big happy smile from younger clients. That’s why patience and flexibility are so important. As a professional with years of experience, I understand that I must have the patience to deal with whatever comes my way and the flexibility to make the most out of any situation.

People Skills

All photographers are created differently. Some photographers are more aloof and put in the bare minimum effort when it comes to speaking with clients. Others, like myself, relish the opportunity to talk with customers. That’s because interacting with subjects allows me the chance to see their vision and transform their idea into art. Talking with subjects lets me draw out their emotions and put younger subjects at ease. People skills are a must in this industry. Luckily for me, it’s one of my favorite parts of the job

Eye for Detail

As a professional photographer in West Ashley, SC I am meticulous when it comes to details. Every element of a photograph should be reviewed to ensure cohesiveness. You might think that a family photo session is cut and dry in terms of composition and detail, but all elements of a photograph must come together to convey the vision that my clients desire.
When you hire me as your photographer, I take all the following elements into consideration:

  • Composition
  • Lighting
  • Emotion
  • Storytelling

If you have a goal you want to construe with your photographs, helping you achieve that goal is often found in the details.

I am proud to say that I am very passionate about my work. However, I’m also passionate about giving my clients the most enjoyable, care-free photography experience possible. My passion drives me to work harder, push farther, and strive to be better every day that I wake up.

Adam Chandler

Ready to Get Started?

One of my favorite things to do is to talk to clients about their vision. If you are in need of professional photography, let’s talk today about what you have in mind. Whether you’re looking for family photography in West Ashley or want new headshots for your employees, I am here to help every step of the way.  

Latest News in West Ashley

Education roundup: Teachers split $15,000 in grants, students honored and more

AIKEN, S.C. (WRDW/WAGT) - The liquid waste contractor at the Savannah River Site has awarded more than $15,000 in educational grants to local elementary school teachers, helping to support science, technology, engineering and math curriculum in their classrooms. Eighteen elementary school teachers in five local counties — Aiken, Allendale, and Edgefield counties in South Carolina and Columbia and Richmond counties in Georgia — were selected for Students/Teachers Achieving Results grants from Savannah River Remediation....

AIKEN, S.C. (WRDW/WAGT) - The liquid waste contractor at the Savannah River Site has awarded more than $15,000 in educational grants to local elementary school teachers, helping to support science, technology, engineering and math curriculum in their classrooms.

Eighteen elementary school teachers in five local counties — Aiken, Allendale, and Edgefield counties in South Carolina and Columbia and Richmond counties in Georgia — were selected for Students/Teachers Achieving Results grants from Savannah River Remediation.

A team of SRR employees reviewed the grant proposals submitted this year and selected the entries to receive the grants based upon excellence in teaching to enhance elementary school science and mathematics programs.

Recipients are:

SRR is a team of companies led by Amentum, with partners Bechtel National, Jacobs, and BWX Technologies, Inc. Critical subcontractors for the contract are Orano, Atkins, and Amentum N&E Technical Services.

CAYCE, S.C. - Dominion Energy and the South Carolina Department of Education have selected winners in each of the state’s regions for the inaugural Strong Men & Women in S.C. History student writing contest.

“Dominion Energy applauds all high school students who took an interest and made the time to participate in our writing contest, and we extend a special congratulations to those whose essays rose to the top,” said Rodney Blevins, president of Dominion Energy South Carolina. “It is encouraging to see our next generation of leaders express their thoughts about causes as important as social justice and racial equity.”

Carter Lanier of Silver Bluff High School was the winner in the CSRA region. Other winners were: Addie Johnson, West Ashley High School (Lowcountry); Braylon Ratcliff, Spring Valley High School (Midlands); Imunique Herriott, HCS Early College High School (Pee Dee); Mishka Richards, Indian Land High School (Upstate).

Each student will receive an Apple MacBook Air laptop and $1,000 for their school. In addition, these winners will be invited to participate in the unveiling ceremony of the 2022 African American History Calendar this fall.

The Aiken County Public School District says parents and guardians of all new and returning students to should register them, for the 2021-22 school year as quickly as possible.

AIKEN, S.C. - With over a decade of experience as a school building leader and 26 years of experience as an educator, Hammond Hill Elementary School Principal Eric Jeffcoat felt the time was right to pursue a new leadership role.

When one of Aiken County Public Schools’ two positions for elementary school executive director was posted, he eagerly applied with the hope of supporting elementary Aiken County principals and empowering them as building leaders.

Aiken County Board of Education members approved Jeffcoat’s appointment as a new executive director for elementary schools for the 2021-22 school year during the school board’s May 25 meeting.

Dr. Mendi Tucker, one of the school district’s two elementary school executive directors, is retiring at the end of June.

“I’m very excited about this new opportunity and I’m ready to get started,” stated Jeffcoat. “When I left the classroom and decided to go into administration, it was because I knew I could have a greater influence on an entire school. This position attracted me because I know I can have greater influence on an entire school district and work with principals in helping them to improve their skills and be more effective in their schools. That really encouraged me.”

Jeffcoat’s academic background includes a Bachelor of Arts degree in Bible and Pastoral Ministries and a Master of Arts in Teaching from Columbia International University. He also holds a Master of Science in Education degree in Leadership for K-12 Programs.

AIKEN, S.C. - The Aiken County Public School District says student registration numbers are crucial to both school district planning and distribution of school-level resources ahead of the 2021-22 school year.

District officials ask that all returning students be registered by June 30.

Information regarding new student registration and pre-Kindergarten registration is available on the home page of the district website and under the “About Us” tab.

Copyright 2021 WRDW/WAGT. All rights reserved.

Editorial: Bike-ped access near Charleston’s North Bridge won’t be cheap. It will be worth it.

We are pleased to see local leaders more committed than ever to establishing a safe way to walk and bike across the Ashley River in the vicinity of the North Bridge. It’s long overdue, as lives have been lost by people trying to navigate the dangerous span that has six lanes for cars and trucks but no sidewalk space. But as officials continue to study the best solution, the complexity and cost of the challenge is becoming more clear: We need more than a safe way across the Ashley River for cyclists and pedestrians. We also need ...

We are pleased to see local leaders more committed than ever to establishing a safe way to walk and bike across the Ashley River in the vicinity of the North Bridge. It’s long overdue, as lives have been lost by people trying to navigate the dangerous span that has six lanes for cars and trucks but no sidewalk space.

But as officials continue to study the best solution, the complexity and cost of the challenge is becoming more clear: We need more than a safe way across the Ashley River for cyclists and pedestrians. We also need a safe crossing of Interstate 26, which hugs the North Charleston shoreline at the eastern terminus of the bridge.

A bike-ped bridge likely would pass under I-26 well south of its Cosgrove Avenue intersection along Baker Hospital Boulevard, though it also could be built north of the bridge and cross I-26 on Azalea Drive. The idea of widening the offramps from I-26 onto Cosgrove — and adding stoplights there that would allow a safe crossing for those on foot or on bike — would need to take traffic volume and safety into account but should not be ruled out at this point.

For the past year, Charleston County has worked on a conceptual design for a 14-foot-wide pedestrian bridge near the North Bridge — formally the World War II Memorial Bridge on S.C. Highway 7. The project team working on the “Better North Bridge” study intends to provide a website presenting at least one concept and cost estimate later this year, and then the public can provide feedback. We urge the county to ensure that work remains on track.

Because even if elected leaders and the public quickly agree on the best plan, the next, even more challenging step will be finding the money to build it. Its ultimate cost could be northward of $30 million, or 50% more than the standalone bike-ped bridge being designed across the Ashley River just south of the U.S. Highway 17 drawbridges.

Some people will blanch at such a large sum to provide safe accommodations for bicyclists and pedestrians, but it’s important to realize that our local bike-ped investments remain a tiny fraction of our overall spending on roads and bridges.

There’s clearly a chicken-and-egg issue, too. Few people consider walking or biking in some places because it’s unsafe to do so. If better sidewalks, bridges and other spaces are provided, that will change, especially because many of us realize the benefits to our health, our environment and our quality of life. It’s also a chance to take some cars off our roads.

Get a weekly recap of South Carolina opinion and analysis from The Post and Courier in your inbox on Monday evenings.

It’s important to note other options have been ruled out: The S.C. Department of Transportation confirmed last year it has no plans to replace the North Bridge anytime soon, and it’s unlikely that the bridge’s structure could handle a bike-ped path attached to one edge.

A safe crossing here also is key to giving West Ashley residents bike-ped access to the new Lowcountry Rapid Transit project, a fast bus link being built between Ladson and downtown Charleston.

While the county is taking the lead on the study, the cities of Charleston and North Charleston have been supportive, too. “Everybody is coming to the table, which I think is the most important part of this,” said Katie Zimmerman of the cycling-advocacy group Charleston Moves.

Local leaders likely will seek federal help to pay for the bulk of the project, as they did successfully with the Ashley River bike-ped bridge in the works near downtown Charleston.

Specifically, the region could apply for a U.S. Department of Transportation RAISE grant (Rebuilding American Infrastructure with Sustainability and Equity, formerly known as a BUILD or TIGER grant).

Those grants are highly competitive; only about 680 projects have been funded out of almost 10,000 applications. They are awarded based on safety, environmental sustainability, quality of life, economic competitiveness, partnerships and other criteria, as well as projects’ ability to improve racial equity, reduce climate change impacts and create good-paying jobs.

The North Bridge project could compete well on those terms. And while we won’t be in a position to meet this year’s July 12 grant deadline, local leaders should ensure they’re fully prepared to apply next year.

SC town with history of sewer leaks may remove pipe that was site of 10-million-gallon spill

HOLLYWOOD — This small town’s beleaguered sewer system may soon get some help, as officials with a larger utility are planning to divert sewage away from leak-prone lines that run through ecologically sensitive streams and marshes. Charleston Water System held a kickoff meeting at the end of May for the project, which would connect Hollywood to CWS’s system at Main Road and Savannah Highway. The tie-in is closer to the town than the current connection with the city of Charleston’s water utility, and would effec...

HOLLYWOOD — This small town’s beleaguered sewer system may soon get some help, as officials with a larger utility are planning to divert sewage away from leak-prone lines that run through ecologically sensitive streams and marshes.

Charleston Water System held a kickoff meeting at the end of May for the project, which would connect Hollywood to CWS’s system at Main Road and Savannah Highway. The tie-in is closer to the town than the current connection with the city of Charleston’s water utility, and would effectively remove 5 miles of sewer line, including a portion that sprang a major leak in 2018.

It would also send sewage through plastic CWS piping that’s only a few years old, instead of the metal Hollywood lines that date to the 1980s and are prone to corrosion. Right now, two parallel 8-mile mains connect Hollywood to CWS’ system in West Ashley, at Stinson Drive. CWS charges Hollywood for treatment of the effluent.

“I am ecstatic, I am happy, happy, happy,” John Dunmyer III, the mayor of Hollywood, said of the proposed project.

CWS is devoting its own resources to designing the new connection and paying for 25 percent of construction costs, while asking the S.C. Rural Infrastructure Authority for a grant to cover the remaining 75 percent. The total cost is estimated at about $700,000, said Russell Huggins, capital projects officer for the water utility.

The grant application period closes in September. Assuming funds are granted, CWS would work to complete the connection by the end of 2022, said Kin Hill, CEO of the water system.

“For a relatively reasonable amount of funding, there will be some very significant improvements,” Hill said.

Hill said he was confident about the monies being awarded because of a history of high-profile sewer problems in Hollywood.

Hollywood is a town of about 5,000 at the southern end of Charleston County, with a mix of older, poorer neighborhoods and upscale subdivisions like Stono Ferry and Poplar Grove. Its sewage collection system was built in the 1980s, both to bring much-needed sanitation to nearby Petersfield and to pave the way for development in the area.

But years of underinvestment and neglect caused major problems for Hollywood’s sewer collection system, a Post and Courier investigation found. The worst incident was a leak that seeped over the first two months of 2018, sending an estimated 10 million gallons of untreated effluent into a tributary of the Stono River.

That episode and other issues led to the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control putting the town under a consent order to improve major problems with its system, which includes 36 miles of pipe and 26 pump stations in all.

A spokeswoman for the agency said Hollywood was in compliance with that order.

Still, DHEC records indicate Hollywood has had five small spills over the past two years. Not all were the town’s fault; the most recent spill, on June 2, happened when a contractor accidentally cracked a sewer line.

Charleston County’s ‘Better North Bridge’ study looks to improve pedestrian access

NORTH CHARLESTON — Charleston-area government officials and bike and pedestrian activists are making progress with a study that seeks to ensure safer transportation across the Ashley River. The North Bridge, which spans almost half a mile from Cosgrove Avenue in North Charleston to Sam Rittenberg Boulevard in West Ashley, has seen several fatalities over the years that have sparked calls for improved access for walkers and cyclists. Charleston County has for the past year been working with several people to develop a conc...

NORTH CHARLESTON — Charleston-area government officials and bike and pedestrian activists are making progress with a study that seeks to ensure safer transportation across the Ashley River.

The North Bridge, which spans almost half a mile from Cosgrove Avenue in North Charleston to Sam Rittenberg Boulevard in West Ashley, has seen several fatalities over the years that have sparked calls for improved access for walkers and cyclists.

Charleston County has for the past year been working with several people to develop a conceptual design for a 14-foot-wide pedestrian bridge that would run parallel to the North Bridge — formally the World War II Memorial Bridge on S.C. Highway 7 — providing people a safer alternative for walking and biking over the waterway.

This comes after previous studies determined that reducing the existing bridge’s number of vehicular lanes, or connecting a pedestrian path to the side of the existing North Bridge would not be feasible.

“We determined the best path forward would be to build a separate structure,” said Richard Turner, the county’s deputy director of public works.

The decision for a pedestrian bridge has not been finalized, but key stakeholders believe there’s enough support to ensure the North Bridge’s safety issues are addressed.

The cities of Charleston and North Charleston, S.C. Department of Transportation, Berkeley-Charleston-Dorchester Council of Governments and Charleston Moves are involved in the efforts to improve safety at the bridge.

Charleston County Council decided last year to spend $85,000 on what has since been nicknamed the “Better North Bridge” study. The county is working to raise awareness and explore general pedestrian bridge designs before those ideas are presented formally to the public.

“We’re trying to show there is a need for this,” said Sheila Sororian, a project manager with the county.

The location of the new bridge would be to the right of those driving from West Ashley to North Charleston along the North Bridge, Turner said.

The new structure could cost $20 million to $30 million, Turner said.

“That’d be my best guess today,” he said.

County officials believe federal grants could be used to pay for the project, similar to how another Ashley River pedestrian bridge is being funded in the city of Charleston.

Funding could also come from the state DOT or COG, Turner said.

“We’re looking at all of those opportunities,” he said.

The death toll on the bridge has remained consistent over the years. There have been three total fatal collisions involving pedestrians or cyclists from 2017 to 2021, according numbers provided by the state Department of Public Safety.

“We’re losing lives,” said Katie Zimmerman, executive director of the mobility advocacy nonprofit Charleston Moves. “I think we have collectively reached a point where it would be impossible to not address the problem.”

Many people bike or walk the bridge to get to work, the grocery store or other appointments. Residents are eagerly anticipating safety improvements.

Charleston Moves has already been soliciting public feedback in North Charleston communities by setting up at key intersections where residents told volunteers how “terrifying” it is crossing the North Bridge.

Several people said they’ve walked or biked the bridge in order to get to work on time after missing the bus.

“The majority of the people we talked to said, ‘Please do something about it,’” Zimmerman said.

Berkeley pitcher among Lowcountry baseball players earning all-state honors

High school athletes made up for lost time in 2021, managing to complete full seasons just a year after spring sports were totally shut down due to COVID-19. State championships for spring sports have now been decided except for two, baseball and softball. The Upper and Lower State championship series are underway this week, with state championships in the five SCHSL classifications to be decided next week. With the completion of sports seasons comes the release of various all-state and all-region teams, selected to honor the t...

High school athletes made up for lost time in 2021, managing to complete full seasons just a year after spring sports were totally shut down due to COVID-19.

State championships for spring sports have now been decided except for two, baseball and softball. The Upper and Lower State championship series are underway this week, with state championships in the five SCHSL classifications to be decided next week.

With the completion of sports seasons comes the release of various all-state and all-region teams, selected to honor the top performers from 2021. These lists are made a little more special after not having any all-state or all-region teams a year ago.

The S.C. Baseball Coaches Association announced its 2021 all-state teams in each classification, as well as region and state players of the year. Locally, 14 players were selected.

Berkeley pitcher Chevy Wrenn, the Region 7-AAAAA player of the year, and West Ashley pitcher Alex Smalls, the Region 8-AAAAA player of the year, lead the group of all-state picks.

Wrenn and Smalls are joined on the Class AAAAA all-state team by Cole Messina, Aidan Hunter and PJ Morlando of Summerville, and Tyler Christmas of Fort Dorchester.

James Island’s Hogan Garner is the lone selection for the Class AAAA all-state team. Bishop England’s Daniel Brooks is the Region 8-AAA player of the year, with teammate Chase Loggins joining him on the AAA all-state team.

Tripp Williams of Philip Simmons is the Region 6-AA player of the year. Tristan Skipper of Philip Simmons and Jake Herndon of Woodland also are Class AA all-state picks.

Jacob Crabb of Palmetto Scholars Academy is the Region 7-A player of the year and a member of the Class A all-state team. Also selected in Class A is Clay Schaffer of Lowcountry Leadership.

Summerville 7, Berkeley 6

Summerville held off a late Berkeley rally to take the first game of the Class AAAAA Lower State baseball championship series on May 24.

Game 2 was set for May 26 at Berkeley’s Jim Bradley Field (after press time).

Berkeley got on the board first with an unearned run in the top of the second, but Summerville rallied for a pair of runs in the bottom of the frame on consecutive RBI doubles by Carson Messina and Mason Hutto.

Cole Messina opened the bottom of the third with a solo homer to dead center, making the score 3-1. Lane Tobin later added an RBI single for a 4-1 Green Wave lead after three innings.

The Stags, however, would not go away, striking for two runs in the top of the fourth inning with Austin Hewette delivering the runs with a single, cutting the lead to 4-3.

Summerville threatened in the fourth, but Berkeley’s Miller McGuire threw out a runner at home to end the inning.

The Green Wave added three runs in the bottom of the fifth, two on wild pitches and another on an RBI groundout, sending the game to the sixth with a 7-3 Summerville lead.

Summerville walked four batters and committed an error, allowing the Stags to score three runs to cut the lead to 7-6.

Summerville sophomore Noah Chapman slammed the door on the Berkeley rally in the sixth and struck out the side in the top of the seventh.

All-Region 8-AAA soccer

Boys

Bishop England – Nick DeFazio, Zander Mullen, Christopher Richardson, Zachary Michael, Benjamin Lordi. Oceanside Collegiate – Michael John Perry, Dominick D’Elia, Ted Van Thullenar. Academic Magnet – Jake Myers, Pope Kennedy. Hanahan – Seth Long. North Charleston – Kevin Vidal.

Girls

Oceanside Collegiate – Jordan Carretta, Julia Cosgrove, Shae Baldwin, Hannah Denton, Korbin Heyward. Academic Magnet – Gracie Mochizuki, Kaylin Morris, Marie Archambault. Bishop England – Kayla Vroman, Lauren Berrigan. Hanahan – Alani Hall. Battery Creek – Natalie Cruz-Woodley.

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