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The impulse to save our most cherished moments is a powerful force. When you ask people to choose three possessions to save from a burning house, one of the most common answers is a photo album.

Maybe that’s because photographs tell the stories of our lives – a timeline of memories filled with faces we love and places we have been. Photos speak directly to our emotions; they capture our attention and give us the power to show people who we are and what we do.

When composed professionally, they shine a light on our personalities, relationships, and families. After all, every human emotion has a place in photography.

Whether you need to steal someone’s attention with a stunning headshot or want to save your most loving family moments, I can help.

My name is Adam Chandler, and as a professional photographer in Seabrook Island, SC I delight in the adventure of photography. I constantly immerse myself in whatever genre I’m shooting and seek new ways of bonding with my subjects to provide them with a thoroughly enjoyable experience.

Unlike other photographers, I use my technical knowledge of photography, ability to connect with people, and artistic creativity to produce memorable photos for my clients. I believe that providing folks with a client-centric experience sets me apart from other photographers in Seabrook Island.

Some professionals may be wonderful composers but cannot understand what their customers want. Others are great at connecting but don’t have the training or experience to make their work truly special.

When you choose Adam Chandler Photography, rest assured that you are hiring a photographer with creativity, imagination, and a keen eye for detail. You won’t ever have to worry about sacrificing one quality for another.

I have a wide range of professional experience in the world of photography. I have had the pleasure of working with a variety of subjects, from local families to corporate business professionals in the Lowcountry. As a photographer in Seabrook Island with more than a decade of experience, my top priority is not only to capture beautiful images but also to provide you with a relaxing, enjoyable photography session.

Service Areas

Now that you know a little about my background, let’s take a look at some of my most popular photography services in Seabrook Island:

Our company mission is to exceed expectations

Your family is probably the single most important part of your life. From children to grandparents, and even nieces and nephews, building a strong family bond secures your legacy for the future.

You will grow and change with your family throughout life and encounter many memorable milestones along the way.  One of the best ways to document these milestones and relive your memories is with a family photo session.

I love family photography and strive to pour my soul and creativity into each shoot. While each session is different, I approach each one with the same goal: to capture the unique personality, affection, and energy of each family so I can provide authentic, engaging pictures and a uniquely fun experience.

Whether you have a newborn baby that you want to celebrate or have grandparents in town for a visit, Seabrook Island is an amazing city for family photography. There are so many locations in the Lowcountry that make for great family photography backdrops:

  • Beaches – Folly Beach, Sullivan’s Island, Kiawah Island, Hilton Head, Edisto Beach
  • Popular Places – Washington Square, Broad Street, Ravenel Bridge
  • Historical Sites – Seabrook Island Battery, Fort Sumter, Magnolia Plantation and Gardens, Rainbow Row

Whatever location you choose for family photography in Seabrook Island, the Holy City is a wonderful place in which to immerse yourself with friends and family.

As a family photographer in Seabrook Island, one of the reasons why I love working with families so much is the opportunity to get creative. I gladly accommodate the style preferences my clients are looking for – be it more traditional, posed images, or candid, playful pictures.

I use a relaxed style of direction to get your family engaged in our photography session, to help get authentic expressions that are full of life and happiness.

Here are just a few reasons why families choose Adam Chandler Photography for their family portraits:

Document Family Growth

With each year that passes, we grow – both literally in size and also in mind. Having annual family photographs helps document the advancements and growth you have in life. Family photography in Seabrook Island is a great way to remember the quirks or personality traits in your children, or to immortalize an important event like a high school graduation. Since we grow and change so fast, many families arrange for yearly family photo sessions to see their family’s growth year over year.

Remember Milestones

With each year that passes, new milestones are achieved. From a child’s first steps to a sibling getting married, there is no better way to remember such happy events than with photographs. Whether you are welcoming a new puppy into your life or just landed the job of your dreams, celebratory pictures of your family will give you heartwarming memories for the rest of your life.

Create Memories

The smiling, radiant face of your daughter after losing her first tooth. The loving glance between newlyweds. The happy father, beaming with pride after his son scored his first touchdown. As a professional photographer in Seabrook Island, SC, drawing out these feelings and emotions and capturing them on film is one of my greatest joys. Not because the pictures are great, but because you, as my client, will have so many years of enjoyment looking back at them.

Portraits and Headshots in Seabrook Island, SC

A great headshot shows you at your best – whether you want to impress a prospective employer or need professional photography for your website. In today’s world of digital dominance, having a professional headshot or portrait of your team is becoming a necessity. It’s no surprise, then, that headshots and portraits are among the most popular genres of photography.

Headshots can be tricky, mostly because many humans just aren’t very photogenic. I know that for some clients, it can be hard posing for a professional photo; knowing their headshot or portrait might make the rounds with future employers.

Fortunately, I have years of experience taking professional headshots. Unlike some amateur photographers, I know how to draw out your personality to capture you at your best. I know how to compose your portrait based on the industry you work in or the goal that you have with your photoshoot. Clients choose Adam Chandler Photography because I advise them every step of the way – from the clothes they should wear to the expression they should have.

A professional headshot or portrait is an investment into your personal brand, and here is why:

Show Your Personality

A great headshot can help give people an idea of your personality before you sit down to meet them. For instance, a serious glance at the camera might convey determination. A big smile may say “I’m approachable.” My goal is to match your expression with your personality with every headshot or portrait I take.

Show Your Professionalism

Clients, collaborators, investors, and employers are much more likely to interview you or call your business if you look professional. You have taken the time to invest in your brand, and the important people you’re sharing your headshot with will appreciate your effort.

Stand Out on Social Media

Many of my clients make appointments for headshots and portraits when they want to stand out from the crowd on social media. Whether you own a business and need to create new social media pages or you are looking to network with recruiters on LinkedIn, a headshot lends an air of professionalism that you won’t get with a selfie.

Show Off Your Current Look

Having outdated headshots can send a message of inauthenticity. When you have up to date headshots, you’re showing clients and employers that you are confident, committed, and authentic.

Qualities of a Great Photographer in Seabrook Island, SC

Being a great photographer means more than owning the best pieces of camera equipment. While a great camera gives clients the clearest, highest quality photos available, it won’t help me connect with my subjects. I strive to give clients a fun, enjoyable photo session. I use my knowledge and experience to help set up the perfect shot. After connecting with my client, I draw out their personality to produce a stunning final product.

Clients choose Adam Chandler Photography because I am different from my peers in the best ways possible. Here are just a few qualities that my clients appreciate:

Imagination

I consider photography to be an artform – one that requires a creative mind and heaps of imagination. A great photographer needs to be able to take something ordinary and transform it into something beautiful. A back-alley puddle is about as mundane as it gets, but with the right technique and a little imagination, it can turn into something with much more substance.

Passion

This quality might seem like a no-brainer to most, but I can’t tell you how many times I’ve seen photography that is missing something. More often than not, the photographer isn’t passionate about the subject or model that he or she is photographing.

Patience

Patience is an essential quality for all great photographers. Some days, picture lighting won’t cooperate. Other days, it’s hard to get that big happy smile from younger clients. That’s why patience and flexibility are so important. As a professional with years of experience, I understand that I must have the patience to deal with whatever comes my way and the flexibility to make the most out of any situation.

People Skills

All photographers are created differently. Some photographers are more aloof and put in the bare minimum effort when it comes to speaking with clients. Others, like myself, relish the opportunity to talk with customers. That’s because interacting with subjects allows me the chance to see their vision and transform their idea into art. Talking with subjects lets me draw out their emotions and put younger subjects at ease. People skills are a must in this industry. Luckily for me, it’s one of my favorite parts of the job

Eye for Detail

As a professional photographer in Seabrook Island, SC I am meticulous when it comes to details. Every element of a photograph should be reviewed to ensure cohesiveness. You might think that a family photo session is cut and dry in terms of composition and detail, but all elements of a photograph must come together to convey the vision that my clients desire.
When you hire me as your photographer, I take all the following elements into consideration:

  • Composition
  • Lighting
  • Emotion
  • Storytelling

If you have a goal you want to construe with your photographs, helping you achieve that goal is often found in the details.

I am proud to say that I am very passionate about my work. However, I’m also passionate about giving my clients the most enjoyable, care-free photography experience possible. My passion drives me to work harder, push farther, and strive to be better every day that I wake up.

Adam Chandler

Ready to Get Started?

One of my favorite things to do is to talk to clients about their vision. If you are in need of professional photography, let’s talk today about what you have in mind. Whether you’re looking for family photography in Seabrook Island or want new headshots for your employees, I am here to help every step of the way.  

Latest News in Seabrook Island

Researchers discover largest-known flock of declining shorebird roosting in coastal SC

Biologists and researchers have discovered that half of a declining shorebird species on the Atlantic is being supported by a nighttime roost off the coast of South Carolina. About 20,000 whimbrel were confirmed roosting at night at the Deveaux Bank Seabird Sanctuary, off Seabrook Island 20 miles south of Charleston, during their annual journey north. The S.C. Department of Natural Resources said it is rare that someone discovers a new-to-science bird migration spectacle, but it is even more rare that an encounter would be so c...

Biologists and researchers have discovered that half of a declining shorebird species on the Atlantic is being supported by a nighttime roost off the coast of South Carolina.

About 20,000 whimbrel were confirmed roosting at night at the Deveaux Bank Seabird Sanctuary, off Seabrook Island 20 miles south of Charleston, during their annual journey north.

The S.C. Department of Natural Resources said it is rare that someone discovers a new-to-science bird migration spectacle, but it is even more rare that an encounter would be so close to a metropolitan area such as Charleston.

Whimbrels are large shorebirds known for their long, curved bills. They migrate yearly across the Western Hemisphere while facing threats of habitat loss and overhunting.

These birds spend winters on South American coasts and then fly thousands of miles north to nest and raise their young across the subarctic regions of Canada and Alaska.

They usually make one stop along the way to rest and feed in places like South Carolina to fuel their breeding season, DNR said.

In the past 25 years, the whimbrel species has declined by two-thirds across the Atlantic Flyway, so the discovery of such a largest roost — the largest known for this species — is important for protecting this rare shorebird.

DNR Biologist Felicia Sanders and a team of researchers confirmed that about 20,000 whimbrel were roosting at night on the island during their spring migration. In 2020, the team documented similar numbers.

Findings were published in Wader Study, a peer-reviewed scientific journal. And a team from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology documented the discovery.

“A lot of people were skeptical, but after tallying results from coordinated surveys by fellow ornithologists and video documentation we are certain of the magnitude of the flock,” Sanders said.

She said finding so many whimbrels on Deveaux Bank gives her hope that the tide can be turned for the species and other declining shorebirds.

Sustaining shorebird species involves protecting seabird sanctuaries such as Deveaux Bank. Seabirds seek large, isolated offshore refuges where there are minimal disturbances from people and predators. Few remain on the Atlantic Coast.

Deveaux Bank is closed year-round above the high-water line, apart from areas designated for limited recreation use. Some of the island’s beaches are also closed for seasonal nesting of coastal birds from March 15 to Oct. 15.

Sanders said it takes a village to protect places as important as Deveaux.

“The discovery at Deveaux Bank really shows the need for conservation efforts to deal with the pressures of growth along our coast and a changing climate,” said Laura Cantral, executive director of the Coastal Conservation League. “South Carolina is lucky to have the experts at DNR so that conservation decisions stem from good science.”

Dr. J. Drew Lanham, a professor of wildlife ecology at Clemson University, said when people think of the shifting nature of the barrier islands, they realize that nothing is ever permanent.

“And so it’s important for us to realize, to understand this discovery on Deveaux and to protect beyond Deveaux, to have these other landing spots,” Lanham said.

A roost so large stands as a testament to the state’s commitment to coastal habitat conservation, DNR said.

Supreme Court strikes down development permits for Kiawah's Capt. Sam's Spit

COLUMBIA, S.C. (WCIV) — South Carolina's Supreme Court again has ruled on the side of environmentalists in an enduring fight over the future of Kiawah Island's imperiled Capt. Sam's Spit, on which developers have long sought to build oceanfront houses. In an opinion published Tuesday, the Supreme Court reversed an earlier ruling by the state's Administrative Law Court which tenta...

COLUMBIA, S.C. (WCIV) — South Carolina's Supreme Court again has ruled on the side of environmentalists in an enduring fight over the future of Kiawah Island's imperiled Capt. Sam's Spit, on which developers have long sought to build oceanfront houses.

In an opinion published Tuesday, the Supreme Court reversed an earlier ruling by the state's Administrative Law Court which tentatively cleared the way for construction of a 2,380-foot metal wall along the Kiawah River on the inland side of the narrow, 170-acre Capt. Sam's Spit peninsula.

It's the third time the Supreme Court has struck down prior rulings by the Administrative Law Court (ALC) that would've allowed Kiawah Development Partners, the group that owns the upland areas of the narrow peninsula, to build a massive erosion prevention wall near the banks of the river.

Kiawah Development Partners have been after government clearance for decades to build the erosion barrier along the river. It's part of a larger plan to construct a road and eventually 50 new beachfront homes on the peninsula. The developers their financial interests

But building on Capt. Sam's Spit isn't so easy. Much of the peninsula is protected against development as a "critical area" under the S.C. Dept. of Health and Environmental Control's Ocean & Coastal Resource Management plan. In light of this, proposals to build the wall in 2014 and 2018 didn't pass muster with DHEC, decisions later affirmed by the Supreme Court despite the ALC's rulings.

In the most recent attempt, developers took a new approach in their attempt to get the nearly 800-yard wall approved, putting forth a plan that would see the wall constructed entirely outside of the peninsula's current critical and protected areas.

Under that scenario, the threshold of scrutiny from DHEC regulators was reduced, and eliminated a requirement for the agency to consider the "long range, cumulative effects" of the development. The plan worked.

DHEC approved the new proposal, and also agreed with Kiawah Development Partners' assessment that development on Capt. Sam's Spit would be in line with the general character of the surrounding area since other portions of Kiawah Island and neighboring Seabrook Island had been developed — even though DHEC in past objections to development plans had described Capt. Sam's Spit as one of only three pristine beaches remaining along the South Carolina coastline.

The ALC then upheld DHEC's rulings, further arguing it was in the public interest to build the lengthy wall. The ALC argued public benefit was met because the wall could protect a particularly vulnerable stretch of Capt. Sam's Spit known as "the neck," located steps away from popular Kiawah Beachwalker County Park.

The Supreme Court hit back on this ALC decision, saying the decision was a "fallacy" because protecting the small area along the neck adjacent to Beachwalker Park didn't justify building the entire wall. Further, the Supreme Court noted the ALC in this decision ignored an existing permit approved years earlier that would allow for a smaller 270-foot retaining wall near Beachwalker Park to specifically address the erosion in the neck area.

"In essence, (Kiawah Development Partners) seeks to hold the protection of the park hostage until it is permitted to construct the entire wall," Justice Kaye G. Hearn wrote on behalf of the court in its majority opinion striking down the approval.

Additionally the Supreme Court ruled the ALC erred in upholding DHEC's reduced scrutiny of the project because it flippantly ignored the long-term potential impacts to the critical area that would be hastened by allowing construction of the wall and the road.

The most recent development proposal forecasts at least 28.5 feet of space needed to install the wall and a road on the spit . The river at the "neck" is currently separated from the protected critical area by less than 10 yards (approx. 29 feet), according to a 2016 measurement cited in the Supreme Court opinion. That distance was 60 feet in 2010, demonstrating the significant rate of erosion.

Thus, the Supreme Court reasoned building the road and the wall would leave less than a foot of buffer between the infrastructure and the protected critical areas. With the known erosion problem, that creates "a virtual certainty" the river bank will eventually erode completely away adjacent to the wall, thus eliminating the public's use of it and further threatening and likely eliminating parts of the protected critical area.

Lastly, the High Court ruled that the developers' motives for building the wall were inescapably related to economic benefits. By law, economic interests cannot supersede the public interest in protection of critical areas, thus the Supreme Court ruled the ALC had erred in upholding the permits for the wall.

“The South Carolina Supreme Court drove home, for the third time, today that it’s still a bad idea," said Laura Cantral, Executive Director of the Coastal Conservation League, which brought the fight against the developers to the Supreme Court. "The fragile piece of sand is no place for a 2,380-foot steel wall, along with a roadway, stormwater management system, and utility lines, which would have been devastating to such an ecologically sensitive and fragile landscape. Captain Sams is a valuable public resource. We are celebrating this victory, and we will continue our fight to protect Captain Sams Spit.”

SC artist’s collaborative COVID-19 Together While Apart Project on exhibit tour

Physical separation became an opportunity, not an obstacle, for Seabrook Island artist Deane Bowers. In the midst of the COVID-19 quarantine, while she was brimming with emotions, Bowers began searching for ways to explore and express them creatively. While her own artwork flourished from the bombardment of unexpected inspiration, within her blossomed a desire to collaborate with other artists in some capacity, despite not being able to do so in per...

Physical separation became an opportunity, not an obstacle, for Seabrook Island artist Deane Bowers.

In the midst of the COVID-19 quarantine, while she was brimming with emotions, Bowers began searching for ways to explore and express them creatively.

While her own artwork flourished from the bombardment of unexpected inspiration, within her blossomed a desire to collaborate with other artists in some capacity, despite not being able to do so in person.

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She was craving community and began developing an idea.

Bowers, who uses reclaimed and recycled materials for much of her multidimensional artwork, began searching her house for what art supplies she could repurpose for a group project.

When she tried to open her basement door, she was met with a stack of shipping boxes from online purchases. That’s when sparks flew.

“It was like the universe literally threw a box in my way and I was like, OK, there’s your answer,” Bowers said.

She started cutting up boxes into 6-by-6-inch squares, with the hopes to find willing participants she could mail them to who would then use them as their canvases.

The goal was to compile the resulting artwork together into somewhat of a cardboard patchwork quilt.

She called the idea the Together While Apart Art Project, and the finished piece is currently being considered for permanent exhibit by the Medical University of South Carolina and McKissick Museum at the University of South Carolina.

“I knew from my own journey as an artist that by processing these events going on in our world, my creativity would help me channel them and I’d start healing myself and finding hope,” Bowers said. “I felt like that would be the case with other people.”

Bowers reached out on all the platforms she had access to, including on her social media pages and during a podcast interview with a Los Angeles-based artist she knew. She wanted to find participants both in and outside of the Lowcountry.

“I really wanted to find a community of people who wanted to be a part of something bigger than themselves,” Bowers said.

From late July until early October, she garnered interest from more than 30 artists across the country that were then whittled down to 19 from eight different states, as some dropped out while other obligations arose.

Bowers sent everyone two to three pieces of a box and told them to think outside the box.

“I wanted them to process whatever they were feeling, positive or negative, and told them to put that into art,” Bowers said.

Meanwhile, she began getting to know the artists who had reached out for the project.

She learned that though in Cleveland, Amy Lauria had a shared love of coastal art, made from her collection of stones, driftwood and beach glass from the shores of Lake Erie.

She discovered Statesville, N.C., participant Cynthia Webb was primarily a jeweler, not a painter, but was still willing to give the project a whirl.

She checked on California participants Nikki Contini and Rebecca Potts during the wildfires.

Everyone began chatting on social media, expressing their hardships during the pandemic and also offering support and encouraging words.

Then Bowers paired up snail mail buddies, sending everyone in the group a pre-stamped envelope biweekly that they could fill with whatever they wanted to send to their selected partner.

In the midst of widespread loss of life, Bowers saw before her eyes a story unfold of new friendships being born despite it all.

“We really became this socially distanced community, connected over this project,” Bowers said. “We all were sheltering in home and in the same pandemic boat, but took comfort in knowing we weren’t in it alone.”

In January, the last finished squares arrived on Seabrook Island.

“When I laid all the squares out on my studio table, I saw that everyone had channeled their heartache, their loneliness, their sadness, their anxiety, all into something positive,” Bowers said. “The synergy was wild.”

Frankie Slaughter’s abstract acrylic and Celie Gehrig’s colorful flowers were bright and childlike splashes of wonder amid the chaos.

Rachel McLaughlin’s piece “No Mud, No Lotus” (Thich Nhat Hanh) perhaps encapsulated the juxtaposition of positive and negative emotions brought on by COVID-19 the most succinctly.

“It’s a reminder that happiness always goes hand-in-hand with struggle and suffering,” she penned. “One cannot exist without the other.”

Charleston participant Cathy Kleiman painted angels in hopes that everyone would have a COVID-19 protector watching over them. But those angels also represented guardians watching over Black Lives Matter demonstrators as they marched for justice.

“I wanted to express that every Black, Brown, White person — whatever race, creed, color or sexual orientation — needed guardian angels watching over them during this time for unity, peace, love, justice, mercy and understanding,” Kleiman said.

After Bowers compiled the separate squares into one finished piece, she began offering it as a traveling exhibit to different galleries, museums and hospitals around the country.

The first to showcase it will be the University of Alabama at Birmingham’s Institute for Arts in Medicine.

“Part of our mission is to enhance the healing environment, and we truly feel this piece will do just that,” said program coordinator Lauren Edwards.

The Together While Apart Art Project will be in Alabama until December and then will travel to the Hickory Museum of Art in North Carolina for six months before arriving at the Medical College of Virginia.

It could end up in Charleston, a notion supported by the South Carolina Arts Commission. Community Arts Development Director Susan DuPlessis expressed the importance of reflections such as this on eras of hardship.

“What especially stands out for me is the idea that community could be created in 6-by-6-inch squares,” DuPlessis said. “It took an artist with a vision who said ‘why not?’ And she went for it. Now, her idea and the creative work of a number of artists who don’t know each other has been stitched together — literally and figuratively.”

Bowers said she wouldn’t mind the project traveling a little longer and heading out to the West Coast before settling down.

She hopes that along with a message of hope it also conveys a powerful revelation she hadn’t expected to discover during the pandemic: You can find and create your own community even if you can’t see them face to face.

“Together, even if apart, we’re better,” she said.

Letters: How will stores check to see if customers are vaccinated?

Some of the major stores have announced that customers who have been vaccinated no longer need to wear a mask. How can they check? ILSE CALCAGNO Hidden Oak Seabrook Island In his May 14 commentary, Will Davis discussed what he views as the problematic nature of schools such as our local Academic Magnet or the Charleston County School of the Arts. While I can agree with his sentiment that more work is needed to address schools in impoverished areas, I feel he missed the purpose of t...

Some of the major stores have announced that customers who have been vaccinated no longer need to wear a mask.

How can they check?

ILSE CALCAGNO

Hidden Oak

Seabrook Island

In his May 14 commentary, Will Davis discussed what he views as the problematic nature of schools such as our local Academic Magnet or the Charleston County School of the Arts.

While I can agree with his sentiment that more work is needed to address schools in impoverished areas, I feel he missed the purpose of these more selective educational institutions.

The goal of creating schools like School of the Arts or Academic Magnet is to create environments full of people who are passionate about what they do.

Any educator can tell you that these are the conditions in which learning best occurs, and as a senior at School of the Arts myself, I can confirm that it works here.

The high success rate in students at these schools isn’t just a result of bringing cream-of-the-crop students together. It comes from the fact these students are able to better learn and grow together.

People seeing their peers succeed are often driven to do the same themselves. This is what these schools aim to capitalize on.

It is important that we help those who are struggling in regular schools, but condemning institutions that seek to help our most brilliant students is not the way to do so.

DAVIS BLACK

Winchester Drive

Charleston

The church marquee on Ashley Hall Road stated: “What’s worse than going to hell? Taking your children with you!”

The sign reminded me of my wife’s family.

Last week, she invited her last four siblings to reunite. They were celebrating the 90th birthday of the oldest.

Five sisters are all that remain of a large family. Over dinner they reminisced. They’d grown up on a farm near Conway where they picked cotton and grew tobacco. Their home got electricity and indoor plumbing when my wife was in high school.

Yet they all had gone to college, so I wondered aloud what had motivated them. They answered in rapid succession:

“Momma had eleven children ...”

“The first two were sons, and then came nine girls ...”

“Which means after mom was 17, she was pregnant 99 months of her adult life ...”

“Which is over eight years of being pregnant!” my wife concluded.

“Daddy never went to school,” the oldest added, “and Momma finished only seventh grade.”

“But Momma would absolutely not let Daddy pull us girls out of school to be just farm labor,” the youngest said. “She wanted her daughters to have options.”

“She wanted to break the cycle,” the nurse among them said, “of women being an appendage.”

“So that’s the ticket,” I asked, “that you came from poverty?”

“Well,” the high school teacher said, “coming from so little does make you hungry.”

“But the ticket was education,” said the college professor. “That’s how Momma made sure we escaped her fate.”

WILL FELTS

Marsh Point Drive

Charleston

Summer is a great time to enjoy local waters. Whether you’re a boater, angler or water sports enthusiast in the Charleston area, please remember to be responsible around the water.

National Safe Boating Week, which kicks off Saturday, is a great time to give boaters some tips for staying safe.

1. Wear a life jacket. Accidents on the water can happen too fast to reach and put on a stowed life jacket. Make sure life jackets are properly fitted.

2. Take a boating safety course. Both America’s Boating Club Charleston and the Coast Guard Auxiliary offer free or affordable classes. Check the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources for a calendar of local course offerings.

3. Make sure your boat is prepared. Schedule a free vessel safety check with America’s Boating Club Charleston or the Coast Guard Auxiliary before you hit the water.

4. Don’t drink while you boat. Alcohol is a leading factor in boating-related deaths.

By following these tips, you can enjoy our waterways responsibly. Let’s make this a great boating season in Charleston.

BILLY LYNES

Commander

America’s Boating Club Charleston

S.C. Highway 35

St. Stephen

I cannot figure out why our government is suing the pharmaceutical companies over the production of opioids when it’s been part of every tragic step of this addiction crisis.

Now the government is putting the blame on Big Pharma and collecting more money to fix problems.

In the end, the problem does not get fixed, but some bank accounts get fatter.

DENNIS COMPTON

Filly Court

North Charleston

Is the Cleveland Indians’ emergency pitching plan sustainable? Hey, Hoynsie

PITTSBURGH --Do you have a question that you’d like to have answered in Hey, Hoynsie? Submit it here. You can also subscribe to Subtext here or text Hoynsie at 216-208-4346 for a two-week free trial. Hey Hoynsie: Regarding manager Terry Francona’s new strategy of limiting innings so th...

PITTSBURGH --Do you have a question that you’d like to have answered in Hey, Hoynsie? Submit it here. You can also subscribe to Subtext here or text Hoynsie at 216-208-4346 for a two-week free trial.

Hey Hoynsie: Regarding manager Terry Francona’s new strategy of limiting innings so that he can pitch guys on short rest: 1. Have you seen that before? 2. How long is that strategy sustainable? -- Darron, Denver.

Hey, Darron: The Rays have used a version of it with the opener and had success. It is a strategy based on matchups and not having four or five quality starters. The Rays have also been able to support the opener with a “bulk’ pitcher who can throw four to six innings.

The strategy the Indians are using was born out of necessity because of injury and poor performances by the rotation. The sustainability, if Francona continues to depend on five or more innings a night from the bullpen, is questionable.

Hey, Hoynsie: The bullpen has been a real strength for the Tribe up to this point in the season. With the current starting pitching problems I don’t see many games where a starter goes deep into the game. -- Frank Glen, Gardner N. J.

Hey, Frank: The bullpen is definitely going to get squeezed under these conditions. Terry Francona and pitching coach Carl Willis are mindful of that. We saw that when James Karinchak and Emmanuel Clase pitched three days in a row against the Orioles. But they’ve both had two days off since headed into Saturday’s game against the Pirates.

Francona believes in protecting his bullpen at all costs. He believes the one way to ruin a season is to overwork the pen. That philosophy is really going to be tested under this situation.

Hey, Hoynsie: Why didn’t the front office promote Bobby Bradley earlier in the season? -- Hank, Seabrook Island, S.C.

Hey, Hank: I think they wanted to give Jake Bauers every chance to become the player they thought he was. They certainly did that. Bauers was also out of options and Bradley has one left.

Bauers was designated for assignment on June 5 and traded to Seattle. Bradley was recalled from Class AAA Columbus on the same day Bauers was DFA’d and is off to a great start. It’s exciting to think what the lineup will look like when Franmil Reyes gets off the injured list and joins Bradley.

Bradley, who will be out of options at the end of the season, has waited for this chance. Let’s see how he takes advantage of it.

Hey, Hoynsie: Do you think when some of the Tribe’s injured players come back that the days of Yu Chang may be history now that Ernie Clement is up? -- Jim Harris, Hilliard.

Hey, Jim: Perhaps, but Chang made the club out of spring training for a reason. He’s shown the ability to play all four infield positions and that’s a plus for him. He’s also starting to come around at the plate.

Hey, Hoynsie: Do you think the Indians will be buyers or sellers at the All-Star break? -- Bob, Louisville.

Hey, Bob: I think it all depends how they come through this stretch of 30 games in 31 days, which will take them into the All-Star break. They’re 6-2 headed into Saturday’s game against the Pirates.

Hey, Hoynsie: How is Logan Allen doing at Class AAA Columbus? -- Natalie Brillhart, Aurora.

Hey, Natalie: Allen is 0-2 with an 11.72 ERA in five starts at Columbus. He is back pitching after being shutdown in late May with a sore left elbow. In his last start Friday, he allowed three runs in four innings against Toledo. He struck out four and walked two.

Hey, Hoynsie: The Tribe is the worst team I have seen with a contending record. Is this the result of the weak AL Central and each team playing each other an absurd 19 times? -- Jim Mullen, Bay Village.

Hey, Jim: The Indians, following Friday’s 11-10 loss to the Pirates, have been playing outside the AL Central for much of June. They own the sixth best record in the AL at 38-29, which means they must be doing something right.

They are 21-12 in the AL Central and that includes a 6-5 record against the White Sox, who own the second best record in the AL and third best in the big leagues. While things are in a state of emergency on the pitching front, overall they may not be as bad as you think.

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