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The impulse to save our most cherished moments is a powerful force. When you ask people to choose three possessions to save from a burning house, one of the most common answers is a photo album.

Maybe that’s because photographs tell the stories of our lives – a timeline of memories filled with faces we love and places we have been. Photos speak directly to our emotions; they capture our attention and give us the power to show people who we are and what we do.

When composed professionally, they shine a light on our personalities, relationships, and families. After all, every human emotion has a place in photography.

Whether you need to steal someone’s attention with a stunning headshot or want to save your most loving family moments, I can help.

My name is Adam Chandler, and as a professional photographer in James Island, SC I delight in the adventure of photography. I constantly immerse myself in whatever genre I’m shooting and seek new ways of bonding with my subjects to provide them with a thoroughly enjoyable experience.

Unlike other photographers, I use my technical knowledge of photography, ability to connect with people, and artistic creativity to produce memorable photos for my clients. I believe that providing folks with a client-centric experience sets me apart from other photographers in James Island.

Some professionals may be wonderful composers but cannot understand what their customers want. Others are great at connecting but don’t have the training or experience to make their work truly special.

When you choose Adam Chandler Photography, rest assured that you are hiring a photographer with creativity, imagination, and a keen eye for detail. You won’t ever have to worry about sacrificing one quality for another.

I have a wide range of professional experience in the world of photography. I have had the pleasure of working with a variety of subjects, from local families to corporate business professionals in the Lowcountry. As a photographer in James Island with more than a decade of experience, my top priority is not only to capture beautiful images but also to provide you with a relaxing, enjoyable photography session.

Service Areas

Now that you know a little about my background, let’s take a look at some of my most popular photography services in James Island:

Our company mission is to exceed expectations

Your family is probably the single most important part of your life. From children to grandparents, and even nieces and nephews, building a strong family bond secures your legacy for the future.

You will grow and change with your family throughout life and encounter many memorable milestones along the way.  One of the best ways to document these milestones and relive your memories is with a family photo session.

I love family photography and strive to pour my soul and creativity into each shoot. While each session is different, I approach each one with the same goal: to capture the unique personality, affection, and energy of each family so I can provide authentic, engaging pictures and a uniquely fun experience.

Whether you have a newborn baby that you want to celebrate or have grandparents in town for a visit, James Island is an amazing city for family photography. There are so many locations in the Lowcountry that make for great family photography backdrops:

  • Beaches – Folly Beach, Sullivan’s Island, Kiawah Island, Hilton Head, Edisto Beach
  • Popular Places – Washington Square, Broad Street, Ravenel Bridge
  • Historical Sites – James Island Battery, Fort Sumter, Magnolia Plantation and Gardens, Rainbow Row

Whatever location you choose for family photography in James Island, the Holy City is a wonderful place in which to immerse yourself with friends and family.

As a family photographer in James Island, one of the reasons why I love working with families so much is the opportunity to get creative. I gladly accommodate the style preferences my clients are looking for – be it more traditional, posed images, or candid, playful pictures.

I use a relaxed style of direction to get your family engaged in our photography session, to help get authentic expressions that are full of life and happiness.

Here are just a few reasons why families choose Adam Chandler Photography for their family portraits:

Document Family Growth

With each year that passes, we grow – both literally in size and also in mind. Having annual family photographs helps document the advancements and growth you have in life. Family photography in James Island is a great way to remember the quirks or personality traits in your children, or to immortalize an important event like a high school graduation. Since we grow and change so fast, many families arrange for yearly family photo sessions to see their family’s growth year over year.

Remember Milestones

With each year that passes, new milestones are achieved. From a child’s first steps to a sibling getting married, there is no better way to remember such happy events than with photographs. Whether you are welcoming a new puppy into your life or just landed the job of your dreams, celebratory pictures of your family will give you heartwarming memories for the rest of your life.

Create Memories

The smiling, radiant face of your daughter after losing her first tooth. The loving glance between newlyweds. The happy father, beaming with pride after his son scored his first touchdown. As a professional photographer in James Island, SC, drawing out these feelings and emotions and capturing them on film is one of my greatest joys. Not because the pictures are great, but because you, as my client, will have so many years of enjoyment looking back at them.

Portraits and Headshots in James Island, SC

A great headshot shows you at your best – whether you want to impress a prospective employer or need professional photography for your website. In today’s world of digital dominance, having a professional headshot or portrait of your team is becoming a necessity. It’s no surprise, then, that headshots and portraits are among the most popular genres of photography.

Headshots can be tricky, mostly because many humans just aren’t very photogenic. I know that for some clients, it can be hard posing for a professional photo; knowing their headshot or portrait might make the rounds with future employers.

Fortunately, I have years of experience taking professional headshots. Unlike some amateur photographers, I know how to draw out your personality to capture you at your best. I know how to compose your portrait based on the industry you work in or the goal that you have with your photoshoot. Clients choose Adam Chandler Photography because I advise them every step of the way – from the clothes they should wear to the expression they should have.

A professional headshot or portrait is an investment into your personal brand, and here is why:

Show Your Personality

A great headshot can help give people an idea of your personality before you sit down to meet them. For instance, a serious glance at the camera might convey determination. A big smile may say “I’m approachable.” My goal is to match your expression with your personality with every headshot or portrait I take.

Show Your Professionalism

Clients, collaborators, investors, and employers are much more likely to interview you or call your business if you look professional. You have taken the time to invest in your brand, and the important people you’re sharing your headshot with will appreciate your effort.

Stand Out on Social Media

Many of my clients make appointments for headshots and portraits when they want to stand out from the crowd on social media. Whether you own a business and need to create new social media pages or you are looking to network with recruiters on LinkedIn, a headshot lends an air of professionalism that you won’t get with a selfie.

Show Off Your Current Look

Having outdated headshots can send a message of inauthenticity. When you have up to date headshots, you’re showing clients and employers that you are confident, committed, and authentic.

Qualities of a Great Photographer in James Island, SC

Being a great photographer means more than owning the best pieces of camera equipment. While a great camera gives clients the clearest, highest quality photos available, it won’t help me connect with my subjects. I strive to give clients a fun, enjoyable photo session. I use my knowledge and experience to help set up the perfect shot. After connecting with my client, I draw out their personality to produce a stunning final product.

Clients choose Adam Chandler Photography because I am different from my peers in the best ways possible. Here are just a few qualities that my clients appreciate:

Imagination

I consider photography to be an artform – one that requires a creative mind and heaps of imagination. A great photographer needs to be able to take something ordinary and transform it into something beautiful. A back-alley puddle is about as mundane as it gets, but with the right technique and a little imagination, it can turn into something with much more substance.

Passion

This quality might seem like a no-brainer to most, but I can’t tell you how many times I’ve seen photography that is missing something. More often than not, the photographer isn’t passionate about the subject or model that he or she is photographing.

Patience

Patience is an essential quality for all great photographers. Some days, picture lighting won’t cooperate. Other days, it’s hard to get that big happy smile from younger clients. That’s why patience and flexibility are so important. As a professional with years of experience, I understand that I must have the patience to deal with whatever comes my way and the flexibility to make the most out of any situation.

People Skills

All photographers are created differently. Some photographers are more aloof and put in the bare minimum effort when it comes to speaking with clients. Others, like myself, relish the opportunity to talk with customers. That’s because interacting with subjects allows me the chance to see their vision and transform their idea into art. Talking with subjects lets me draw out their emotions and put younger subjects at ease. People skills are a must in this industry. Luckily for me, it’s one of my favorite parts of the job

Eye for Detail

As a professional photographer in James Island, SC I am meticulous when it comes to details. Every element of a photograph should be reviewed to ensure cohesiveness. You might think that a family photo session is cut and dry in terms of composition and detail, but all elements of a photograph must come together to convey the vision that my clients desire.
When you hire me as your photographer, I take all the following elements into consideration:

  • Composition
  • Lighting
  • Emotion
  • Storytelling

If you have a goal you want to construe with your photographs, helping you achieve that goal is often found in the details.

I am proud to say that I am very passionate about my work. However, I’m also passionate about giving my clients the most enjoyable, care-free photography experience possible. My passion drives me to work harder, push farther, and strive to be better every day that I wake up.

Adam Chandler

Ready to Get Started?

One of my favorite things to do is to talk to clients about their vision. If you are in need of professional photography, let’s talk today about what you have in mind. Whether you’re looking for family photography in James Island or want new headshots for your employees, I am here to help every step of the way.  

Latest News in James Island

SC’s new rules for flounder catch go into effect July 1, as state embarks on a new hatchery

South Carolina has implemented stricter rules on the harvest of flounder, which will go into effect July 1. Populations of summer flounder, a popular fish that spans coastal waters from Georgia to North Carolina, have been in severe decline for decades. The rules are aimed at letting the species, an iconic catch that’s prized for its rich taste, bounce back to previous levels. The new rules include: The standards are far looser than a suite of regulations the S.C. Department of Natural Resources proposed earlier t...

South Carolina has implemented stricter rules on the harvest of flounder, which will go into effect July 1.

Populations of summer flounder, a popular fish that spans coastal waters from Georgia to North Carolina, have been in severe decline for decades. The rules are aimed at letting the species, an iconic catch that’s prized for its rich taste, bounce back to previous levels.

The new rules include:

The standards are far looser than a suite of regulations the S.C. Department of Natural Resources proposed earlier this year. Those rules would have kept size restrictions the same but reduced catch limits to two fish per person or six per boat.

The most controversial provision was eschewed entirely: a season for the flounder catch, running from about the beginning of July to the end of October.

Though the regulations were scaled down, “It will still get us going in the right direction,” said Mel Bell, director of DNR’s Office of Fisheries Management.

English Glover, a former charter boat captain and a Grand Strand fishing commentator on local TV and radio programs, said the new rules were generally a positive for conservation efforts. But he was adamantly opposed to the idea of a set season. It would have deprived revenue for bait and tackle shops and other parts of the industry that supports recreational anglers, he said.

“It would be devastating in so many different realms of fishing here in the Carolinas,” he said.

North Carolina, meanwhile, has already instituted a season, which will get even more restrictive this year. Recreational seekers of the flatfish will only have two weeks at the beginning of September to catch them, and the much larger commercial fishery will be able to harvest on staggered two-week schedules from different sections of the coast.

That leaves the risk that opportunistic operations will descend on the Palmetto State’s waters to make up the difference. State Sen. Stephen Goldfinch, R-Murrells Inlet, said steeper fees for out-of-state fishing licenses that the Legislature passed along with the new catch limits will hopefully help avert that.

Those higher fees will also, in part, fund a new effort in South Carolina: a hatchery to grow more flounder and release them into coastal waters. The state has had success before in stocking species like red drum, but flounder have a complex life cycle and are notoriously hard to grow in an artificial setting, said Tanya Darden, the assistant director of DNR’s coastal lab on James Island.

The larvae, for example, don’t have both eyes on one side of their head, as bottom-dwelling adult flounder do. The eyes migrate together as infant fish grow older, but only in a delicately balanced combination of environmental conditions. Temperature also determines the sex of the fish, leaving the possibility that water at the wrong degree will produce only males, Darden said.

Some other states have flounder hatcheries, but they produce fish on smaller scales, to the tune of 100,000 a year. DNR doesn’t know yet how many it will be able to produce, but whatever the number, it likely couldn’t save the fishery by itself — that would take tens of millions of fish, according to DNR.

“It’s going to be a challenge for us. It’s one we’re up to,” Darden said.

Reach Chloe Johnson at 843-735-9985. Follow her on Twitter @_ChloeAJ.

Dumpster Dads Is Providing Dumpster Rental Services In Charleston SC

Dumpster Dads is providing dumpster rental services to residents and businesses in Charleston, South Carolina. Readers can find out more about their services by heading over to https://www.thedumpsterdads.com/dumpster-rental-charleston-sc/. The company makes available 15 cubic yard dump trailers and 20 cubic yard roll-off trailers for a variety of purposes. Regardless of how big or small the project is, its trailers are the per...

Dumpster Dads is providing dumpster rental services to residents and businesses in Charleston, South Carolina. Readers can find out more about their services by heading over to https://www.thedumpsterdads.com/dumpster-rental-charleston-sc/.

The company makes available 15 cubic yard dump trailers and 20 cubic yard roll-off trailers for a variety of purposes. Regardless of how big or small the project is, its trailers are the perfect companion to ensure a clean workspace and to not have to worry about garbage disposal. They are the ideal choice for projects such as multi-room cleanouts, fencing, kitchen remodels, attic cleanouts, demolitions, and more.

The small 15 cubic yard dumpster rental is 14 feet long, 7 feet wide, and 4 feet high. It is designed to fit in the driveway and is easy to load. The company charges $375 for 1 week of rental time and 2 tons of weight for non-organic loads. It charges $75 per ton for every tonnage over 2 tons for non-organic loads. It charges $300 for 1 week of rental time and 2 tons of weight for organic loads. It charges $30 per ton for every tonnage over 2 tons for organic loads. It also charges $10 per day for every extra day of rental over 1 week for both organic and non-organic loads.

The 20 cubic yard dumpster rental is 14 feet long, 8 feet wide, and 5 and a half feet high. It is perfect for jobs where a lot of waste is expected to be generated. The company charges $400 for 30 days of rental time and 2 tons of weight for non-organic loads. It charges $75 per ton for every tonnage over 2 tons for non-organic loads. It charges $300 for 1 week of rental time and 2 tons of weight for organic loads. It charges $30 per ton for every tonnage over 2 tons for organic loads. It also charges $10 per day for every extra day of rental over 1 week for organic loads and every extra day of rental over 30 days for non-organic loads.

The company says that the pricing gets reset every time that a trailer is dumped and returned. The company asks that the customer be careful with the loads as any non-organic fines issued at the dump will be the customer’s responsibility. The company requires the driveway or drop-off spot to be 10 feet wide to access. The company may charge extra fees for locations outside of its service area.

A spokesperson for the company, Michael Spitz, talks about its inception by saying, “The company was founded by three founding partners, all of whom have separate careers. While renovating and working on investment properties, we noticed that long turnaround times and high costs of dumpsters were slowing us down and the delays were costing us thousands of dollars. We decided to build Dumpster Dads together because of our past experiences to address this pressing need for professional and affordable dumpster services. We decided that there must be a more efficient, reliable way to facilitate the needs of businesses and homeowners in the region. After months of planning and finding the right team, Dumpster Dads was born. Today, we are offering a cost-effective alternative to other companies along with unmatched customer service. If you are looking for a way to clear out the waste for a project, call us and you will find out why we are the best option for Charleston SC dumpster rentals.”

Dumpster Dads is a locally owned and operated company that serves the areas of Charleston, Daniel Island, North Charleston, West Ashley, Mt. Pleasant, James Island, Summerville, Sullivans Island, Isle Palms, Johns Island, and Goose Creek. The company can be contacted at the phone number (843) 433-2189. Customers can also directly book a dumpster online on its website. The company’s working hours are from Monday to Friday from 7:00 AM to 5:00 PM and 7:00 AM to 12:00 PM on Saturday.

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For more information about Dumpster Dads, contact the company here:

Dumpster Dads
Michael Spitz
(843) 433-2189
dads@thedumpsterdads.com
2579 Oscar Johnson Dr, Suite D
North Charleston, SC 29405

SC legislators agree to $10.7B spending plan with 2.5% raise for all state employees

COLUMBIA — The budget compromise legislators agreed to June 17 provides every K-12 teacher at least a $1,000 pay hike, all state employees a 2½ percent raise, and law enforcement officers an additional boost. A joint House-Senate panel voted unanimously to advance the $10.7 billion spending package for the fiscal year starting July 1. The full Legislature returns for a special session next week to approve the deal and send it to Gov. Henry McMaster. “This is a great budget that focuses on teachers and ...

COLUMBIA — The budget compromise legislators agreed to June 17 provides every K-12 teacher at least a $1,000 pay hike, all state employees a 2½ percent raise, and law enforcement officers an additional boost.

A joint House-Senate panel voted unanimously to advance the $10.7 billion spending package for the fiscal year starting July 1.

The full Legislature returns for a special session next week to approve the deal and send it to Gov. Henry McMaster.

“This is a great budget that focuses on teachers and education, workforce training, infrastructure and law enforcement,” House Ways and Means Chairman Murrell Smith, R-Sumter, said. “There’s a real concentration on the core functions of government and there are tremendous investments in these areas.”

The budget deal puts $100 million toward school construction in poor, rural areas that lack the ability to pay for it through local property taxes; $15 million of that can be used to incentivize the merging of tiny districts. And it spends $34 million to expand full-day, state-paid kindergarten for poor 4-year-olds throughout the state.

The $1,000-per-teacher salary boost, costing $72 million, is in addition to the normal pay bump teachers receive for an additional year of experience. The budget covers those so-called step increases with a $65 million increase in per-pupil funding. However, the state stops paying for those steps, which average 2 percent, at 23 years in the classroom.

Bus drivers should also see a raise, though likely minimal. The budget spends $4.2 million for a 5 percent boost in what the state sends school districts for drivers’ minimum hourly pay, which ranges this school year from $7.85 to $11.55. What bus drivers actually make depends on how much districts add with local property taxes.

Other increases for K-12 public schools include $114 million for instructional materials, to ensure the textbooks and software teachers use actually align with what they’re supposed to be teaching. And it spends an additional $34 million on public charter schools to cover increased enrollment and the opening of new schools.

Public colleges collectively get an additional $40 million as a way to ensure they don’t increase tuition.

That’s in addition to more than $500 million in one-time cash split between universities, two-year colleges and technical schools for general maintenance and renovations.

“You could almost call it an education budget, there were so many things we did for education this year,” Senate Finance Chairman Hugh Leatherman, R-Florence, said. “This budget will continue to move our state forward.”

As for state employee raises, the budget negotiators split the difference between the House and Senate versions. The House plan passed earlier this month provided a 3 percent cost-of-living raise across all state agencies, while the Senate proposal provided 2 percent. So they agreed to spend $60 million on a 2½ percent raise for all employees.

State law enforcement agencies, which are struggling to keep officers and fill vacancies, will receive millions more for bigger pay increases aimed at boosting their ranks.

Senators agreed to spend up to $23.25 million to buy 23 acres on James Island that has operated as a Catholic convent for decades. The House added that spending earlier this month after lawmakers learned about the opportunity to buy the waterfront property and preserve it for generations to come.

The plan also spends $200 million to pay for improvements at the Port of Charleston, as a first of a multi-phase funding effort.

In February, the state Senate approved a proposal to borrow $550 million toward the project in North Charleston. But that idea went nowhere in the House, after it became clear the state’s economy was far rosier than anticipated.

“We paid cash on the port rather than use a bond bill,” Smith said. “Fortunately, our revenues allowed us to make an investment in the port, which is the economic engine of the state.”

CityWatch: Welcome news on environmental preservation

So let’s leave some blue up above us Let’s leave some green on the ground It’s only ours to borrow Let’s save some for tomorrow Leave it and pass it on down — Alabama, “Pass It On Down” Two recent events in South Carolina, one legislative and one judicial, had me thinking about that great environmental song by the legendary country band Alabama. Back to those news items in a moment. First, I’ll put my ...

So let’s leave some blue up above us

Let’s leave some green on the ground

It’s only ours to borrow

Let’s save some for tomorrow

Leave it and pass it on down

— Alabama, “Pass It On Down”

Two recent events in South Carolina, one legislative and one judicial, had me thinking about that great environmental song by the legendary country band Alabama. Back to those news items in a moment.

First, I’ll put my cards on the table: I am an environmental preservationist, and proud of it.

While I have been invited to join the boards of numerous civic, cultural and political organizations over the years, I politely turned almost all of them down due to fortunately having too much work and unfortunately not enough time.

But there were two exceptions I immediately said yes to: the South Carolina Nature Conservancy and the Friends of Congaree Swamp. I served on the boards of those fine groups for over a decade each, because they were (and are) fighting to preserve the incredible natural beauty of our state.

By the way, Alabama agreed to donate “Pass It On Down” for us to use in a TV spot for the SC Nature Conservancy some 20 years ago.

We simply combined beautiful, meaningful video of the natural wonders of South Carolina with the beautiful, meaningful lyrics and music of the song to create a memorable promotional spot for the organization. I don’t know if the guys in Alabama ever saw it, but we sent them a copy.

And if their twice COVID-delayed 5Oth anniversary concert at Colonial Life Arena finally happens in January as scheduled, I certainly hope they perform the song. In the meantime, if you’ve never heard it I urge you to call it up online and check out the most down-to-earth song ever written about protecting the earth.

Now to those big environmental preservation stories, starting with the legislative one.

In an out-of-nowhere piece of great news, the House Ways and Means Committee unanimously approved a $23 million allocation to purchase the Sisters of Charity of our Lady of Mercy property on the James Island side of Charleston harbor.

The elderly nuns had recently put the pristine 23-acre waterfront site up for sale, and with development no doubt looming, House leaders acted both smartly and quickly to preserve the historic and beautiful property.

Legislators said they envision it being an ideal place for weddings and other events, educational field trips, conferences and exploration on walking and biking trails, as well as preserving and celebrating the remarkable history of the nuns who lived and worked there.

The land would be purchased by the state Department of Natural Resources, which already owns adjoining property where the Revolutionary War-era Fort Johnson once stood. The two properties combined would provide public access to almost a mile of beautiful harbor front views and vistas.

Having seen it many times by boat while exploring the waterways around Folly Beach over the years, I agree that this is both a wise act of land conservation as well as a wise investment of state funds.

But while the legislative train seems to be on the tracks (or the boat on the water, as it were), citizens should contact both their House and Senate members this week to make sure nothing stalls the momentum as the bill moves to a final vote.

Shifting to the judicial side of government, the State Supreme Court recently ruled against developers who are trying to put high end homes on Captain Sam’s Spit, adjacent to Kiawah Island.

As the name implies, Captain Sam’s Spit is little more than a sandbar sitting precariously on the edge of the ocean. While development there may be possible (though only with a proposed 2;,000 foot steel sea wall), it is also a fool’s errand.

The Supreme Court rebuffed those fools, as it has now done in four consecutive cases brought on the matter. Here’s to the court.

And here’s to realizing that it’s only ours to borrow, let’s save some for tomorrow.

Kevin Fisher is president of Fisher Communications, a Columbia advertising and public relations firm. He is active in local issues involving the arts, conservation, business and politics.

Editorial: A promising step to preserve James Island’s history, beauty

We owe a debt of gratitude to state Sen. Chip Campsen and other lawmakers who moved quickly to strike a deal to purchase the 23-acre waterfront property on James Island known as May Forest, home to the Sisters of Charity of Our Lady of Mercy. We urge the Legislature and Gov. Henry McMaster to close the $23.25 million deal as their work on the state budget wraps up. It’s become a bit cliche to say something “checks a lot of boxes,” but when it comes to this land deal, that’s so true. First, the purchase w...

We owe a debt of gratitude to state Sen. Chip Campsen and other lawmakers who moved quickly to strike a deal to purchase the 23-acre waterfront property on James Island known as May Forest, home to the Sisters of Charity of Our Lady of Mercy. We urge the Legislature and Gov. Henry McMaster to close the $23.25 million deal as their work on the state budget wraps up.

It’s become a bit cliche to say something “checks a lot of boxes,” but when it comes to this land deal, that’s so true.

First, the purchase would support the already first-rate campus that the state Department of Natural Resources operates at the northern end of Fort Johnson Road — a site that mixes marine research facilities with nods to the property’s rich history as an important fort facing Charleston Harbor. DNR would own the property.

Second, and crucially, the deal would lead to greater public access, possibly including trails, a park-like space along the 750-foot-long waterfront and venues that could be rented out for weddings and the like. It’s envisioned the S.C. Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism would manage all that.

Third, the deal would prevent any development that would lead to a loss of trees, more traffic, more stormwater runoff and degradation of the site’s wildlife habitat and possible historical and archaeological features.

Fourth, the future of this sensitive, scenic property would be owned and shaped by all of us, and we would have the chance to ensure it adds to our quality of life.

May Forest, a wooded, unassuming property, never had a “For Sale” sign stuck at its entrance, but word has been getting around that the nuns were planning to sell it. Charleston Mayor John Tecklenburg said he became aware of that when a developer called to ask what the city would like to see on the site. “I called him back to say, ‘A park! That’s what the city would like to see there.’”

The tight timetable and large price tag meant any such deal would be beyond what the city and Charleston County could do with local greenbelt dollars, and the mayor credited state Rep. Spencer Wetmore and other local lawmakers, especially Sen. Campsen, for taking the lead. “Chip Campsen has a lifelong passion for conservation and has helped this state in that regard immeasurably,” Mr. Tecklenburg said. “This is just another example. This is a continuation of his commitment to meaningful conservation that he’s been engaged in for decades.”

Get a weekly recap of South Carolina opinion and analysis from The Post and Courier in your inbox on Monday evenings.

At this point, the most important thing is for the Legislature to seal the deal. We’re pleased the House’s budget-writing committee unanimously approved its inclusion in the state’s $10.7 billion budget, and we urge other lawmakers to support it as well. Reporter Seanna Adcox noted that Sen. Campsen feels a sense of urgency.

“We’re competing with others,” he said, according to her report. “If we don’t acquire this, it will end up being developed pretty intensively. And God’s not making any more coastal real estate.”

Mr. Campsen is right. This is a rare opportunity to give the public greater access to a beautiful waterfront property, something that will be more and more difficult as the Charleston area continues to feel the pressures of development.

Once the deal is done, other stakeholders can weigh in on the next steps. Douglas Bostick, a James Island resident and executive director of the South Carolina Battleground Preservation Trust, was aware that the May Forest property was up for sale and rightly became concerned that private development would erode remnants of its history.

“We know that Civil War Fort Johnson extended into the May Forest property, and we believe that the Revolutionary War activity extended here as well,” he said. “The May Forest property has never been formally surveyed by professional archaeologists. We would encourage the state to have the property studied by the South Carolina Institute for Archaeology and Anthropology.”

The planning also should consider how best to acknowledge the nuns’ stewardship of the property, which the Sisters of Charity of Our Lady of Mercy has owned since the end of World War II. The 192-year-old religious congregation also helped found what eventually became Bon Secours St. Francis Hospital, now part of Roper St. Francis Healthcare.

We also encourage a broader public discussion on the site’s future use. Some lawmakers reportedly feel it would be an ideal place for weddings, educational field trips and conferences and residents, as well as a scenic park for those on foot or on a bike. That all sounds like a good start; Mayor Tecklenburg said if desired, the city’s Parks Department would be willing to play a role.

With the existing DNR Fort Johnson property to the east and the city’s Melton P. Demetre Sunrise Park to the west, an impressive amount of the northern shore of James Island would be open and accessible to the public. We find a lot to like about that.

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