Family Photographer in Sullivan's Island, SC

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We've all heard the expression "a picture is worth a thousand words". And photos really are a special way to help tell the story of our lives - who we are and what's important to us.

And, of course, some images speak to us more strongly than others. More often than not we love a photo not so much because it shows us how we look but because it captures a very human element that is hard to express in words – an authentic connection with those we love or with ourselves and how we show up or want to be seen in the world.

Whether you're looking to capture someone's attention with a professional headshot or want to commemorate the beautiful connection with your partner or family, I can help.

My name is Adam Chandler, and as a professional photographer in Sullivan's Island, SC. I truly find joy and fulfillment in the work I do. I love the adventure of photography and I continually immerse myself in learning and exploring how to improve my craft which includes learning new ways to connect with and capture my subjects. I truly understand that, for many people (if not most), even the idea of having your picture taken can cause a good bit of discomfort and anxiety. That's why I place so much importance on putting my subjects at ease while also really listening to any concerns or wants they have for their session.

I draw upon my technical knowledge of photography, my ability to connect with people, and my creativity to produce beautifully memorable photos for my clients. I believe that my unique creative vision and many years of experience combined with the way I strive to give my clients the most enjoyable experience possible sets me apart from some of the other great photographers in Sullivan's Island.

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Family Photography Sullivan's Island, SC  Photographer Sullivan's Island, SC

Testimonials

Now that you know a little about my background, let's take a look at some of
my most popular photography services in Sullivan's Island: My mission is to beautifully capture the joy and connection of each unique family while also creating a fun experience for my clients.

 Portrait Photographer Sullivan's Island, SC

The importance of family is hard to overstate. From children to grandparents to nieces and nephews, families and the family dynamic can grow and change before you know it, with many beautiful milestones taking place along the way.

I think that one of the best ways to remember some of these important moments of togetherness is with a fun family photo session.

I absolutely love photographing families and, while no two families are the same, I always strive to give each session my all in order to best connect with and capture the uniqueness of each family. Even though each session is somewhat different, I approach each one with the same goal: to capture the distinct personality, affection, and energy of each family in order to provide authentic, engaging pictures and a joyful experience.

Whether you have a toddler that you want to celebrate or have grandparents in town for a visit, Sullivan's Island is an amazing city for family photography. There are so many locations in the Lowcountry that make for great family photography backdrops:

  • Beaches - Folly Beach, Sullivan's Island, Kiawah, Seabrook, Isle of Palms, Hilton Head, Edisto Beach
  • Popular Places - Washington Square, Broad Street, Hampton Park, Waterfront Park, Shem Creek, The Cistern at College of Sullivan's Island
  • Historical Sites - Sullivan's Island Battery, Fort Sumter, Magnolia Plantation and Gardens, Rainbow Row

Whatever location you choose for family photography in Sullivan's Island, the Holy City is a wonderful place to explore and enjoy with friends and family.

As a family photographer in Sullivan's Island, one of the reasons why I love working with families so much (in addition to getting to meet some really awesome people) is the opportunity to combine my creativity with my ever-evolving technical skill. I also gladly accommodate the style preferences my clients are looking for - be it more traditional, posed images, or candid, playful pictures.

I use a clear yet relaxed style of direction to get you and your family engaged in our photography session, to help get authentic expressions that really show the unique dynamic and relationships of each family.

Here are just a few reasons why families choose Adam Chandler Photography for their family portraits:

Document Family Growth

Change, of course, is part of life and with each passing year families, too, change and often grow. Each stage is beautiful in its own way and having annual family photographs is a fun way to document the different seasons of family life. Be it a new baby, a birthday or anniversary or simply wanting to capture your kids at each special age, I'd be honored to be chosen to help tell the story of your family over the years.

Remember Milestones

With each year that passes, new milestones are reached. From a child's first steps to a sibling getting married, there is no better way to remember these wonderful occasions than with quality photographs. Whether you're welcoming a new puppy into your life, are celebrating an anniversary or finally have gathered your extended family together in one place, capturing these special times in your life is a great way to ensure you'll be able to enjoy and relive these moments years from now.

Create Memories

Many families tell me before their sessions that it's not often that they are all able to be together and they emphasize how special and important this session is. Or, perhaps, a mom or dad will talk about how fleetingly special a certain age of their child is and how they really want to capture their children's personalities. Even if you capture lots of great moments of your family throughout the year it's likely not very often that all of you are in the pictures at once (other than maybe having a stranger tell you to "say cheese" after you hand them your phone. Having a time that's dedicated to capturing the special bonds between family members - parents and their children, grandparents and their grandchildren, siblings and maybe extended family as well - is so important. We all know just how special these people and moments are and how we tend to treasure these memories more with each passing year.

Portraits And Headshots In Sullivan's Island, SC

A great headshot shows you at your best - whether you want to impress a prospective employer or need professional photography for your website. In today's digitally-intensive society, having a professional headshot or portrait of you or your team that stands out for all the right reasons is becoming a necessity. It's no surprise, then, that headshots and portraits are among the most popular genres of photography.

Headshots can be tricky, mostly because many (if not most) people don't like being in front of the camera (trust me, I totally get that). I know that for some clients, it can be hard to know what to do, what to wear or how to relax enough to let their authentic selves come through so that they can end up with a professional photo or headshot that inspires authenticity and confidence.

Fortunately, I have years of experience taking professional headshots of all types of people. No matter what your comfort level is with having your picture taken, I pride myself on being able to create the conditions necessary to help capture my clients as you want to be seen. Through lighting, posing and direct yet relaxed interaction I'll help guide you to great photos that you’ll be proud to showcase and share with others.

A professional headshot or portrait is an investment into your personal brand, and here is why:

 Portrait Photographer Sullivan's Island, SC
 Best Photographer Sullivan's Island, SC

Show Your Personality

Not all headshots should be approached the same way. Depending on your industry or how you'll be using the photos, there are certain things to consider. A great headshot reflects not just how you look but also how you show up in the world. It can help give people an idea of the kind of person you are before you sit down to meet them. Oftentimes, too, people may want a variety of "looks" to suit different needs and uses. My goal is to listen to your expectations and then deliver results that will serve you will in your professional and/or personal life.

 Beach Photography Sullivan's Island, SC

Show Your Professionalism

Clients, collaborators, investors, and employers are typically much more likely to interview you or to contact you or your business if you look professional. If you've taken the time to invest in your brand, in part by making the effort to arrange a professional headshot, people notice that. And who doesn't want to make a great first (or second or third) impression?

 Family Portrait Photographer Sullivan's Island, SC

Stand Out on Social Media

Many of my clients make appointments for headshots and portraits when they want to stand out from the crowd on social media. Whether you own a business and need to create new social media pages or you're looking to network with recruiters on LinkedIn or, perhaps, update your website, a professional headshot can definitely set you apart in the modern sea of selfies and snapshots that you often see out there.

 Wedding Photographer Sullivan's Island, SC

Show Off Your Current Look

None of us look the same as we did 10 or 15 years ago yet some of us keep the same photo up for decades. Having outdated headshots can send a message of inauthenticity. When you have up-to-date, professional headshots, you're showing clients and employers that you are confident, committed, and authentic.

 Headshots Sullivan's Island, SC

Qualities Of A Great Photographer In Sullivan's Island, SC

Being a great photographer means more than owning fancy equipment. While having expensive gear can be quite helpful, the real test of a professional, for me, has a lot more to do with being able to draw upon my deep understanding of the craft of photography so that I can focus more on connecting with and beautifully capturing my subjects without getting bogged down in figuring out the technical side of things. It's taken me many years to get where I am and I'm always striving to improve in order to continue to deliver the best pictures and most enjoyable experience possible for my clients.

Clients choose Adam Chandler Photography because my experience shows and they trust me to always give them the results and experience that they're looking for. Here are just a few qualities that my clients appreciate:

 Engagement Photography Sullivan's Island, SC

Imagination

I wholeheartedly consider photography to be an artform - one that requires lots of curiosity and imagination along with a good bit of technique. A great photographer knows how to get beautiful results no matter what the conditions or circumstances are and this only comes with experience and preparation.

Family Photography Sullivan's Island, SC

Passion

This quality might seem obvious but I can't tell you how many times I've seen photography that may be technically good but is missing something. My passion for photography largely comes from my passion for connecting with people in a way that helps them feel comfortable letting their guard down so they can enjoy the process. And this almost always leads to exceptional, authentic images.

 Photographer Sullivan's Island, SC

Patience

Patience can also be essential for great photos. As in life, there are many things that we just can't control. Sometimes the best photos come from patiently going with the flow and not trying to force something to happen. I find that when I'm patient yet prepared - ready to capture the right moment or expression when the time is right - that's often the best approach. As a professional with many years of experience, I understand the importance of having the patience to deal with whatever comes my way as well as the flexibility and preparedness to make the most out of any situation.

 Portrait Photographer Sullivan's Island, SC

People Skills

If ever there was a business where people skills were important I think portrait photography is definitely one of them. Knowing how uncomfortable many people can be when getting their pictures taken, I put every effort into helping ensure the best possible experience for my clients and communication is such a big part of that. I love interacting with my clients to build trust and rapport as well as a deep understanding of your expectations including any concerns you may have. As I've said, for me my job is not just about delivering beautiful images but also a wonderful client experience. That's why I focus so much on each and every interaction with my clients. Yes, people skills are a must in this business. Luckily for me, it's one of my favorite parts of the job!

Eye for Detail

As a professional photographer in Sullivan's Island, SC I am meticulous when it comes to details. Through my many years of photographing many different types of subjects under many different circumstances I've come to learn just how important details are. Whether it's finding or creating the best quality of light for my clients, eliciting a great expression or
adjusting the background or, perhaps, a piece of clothing, all of these things impact the overall look and feel of a photo. Whether I'm photographing a family, a business professional or a couple in love I always look for all the ways I can create the best image possible.

 Portrait Photographer Sullivan's Island, SC
 Best Photographer Sullivan's Island, SC

"As I hope you can tell by looking at my work, I really love my job. And most of all I love the people I get to meet and work with. I'd be honored and delighted to be chosen for your photography needs."

Adam Chandler

Ready to Get Started?

One of my favorite things to do is to talk to clients about what they're looking for and how I can serve them. If you are in need of professional photography, let's talk today about what you have in mind. Whether you're looking for family or couples' photography in Sullivan's Island or want great new headshots for you or your team, I'm here to help every step of the way!  

Latest News in Sullivan's Island, SC

Sullivan’s Island restaurant’s retention rate stands out amid staffing crisis

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Obstinate Daughter bar manager Frank Arevalo has always been a fan of celebrating career milestones.Since joining the island standby eight years ago, he has helped make this ethos a part of everyday life for the restaurant’s employees.When a member of Obstinate Daughter’s team celebrates a one-, two- or six-year anniversary, Arevalo honors their achievement on social media.There have b...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Obstinate Daughter bar manager Frank Arevalo has always been a fan of celebrating career milestones.

Since joining the island standby eight years ago, he has helped make this ethos a part of everyday life for the restaurant’s employees.

When a member of Obstinate Daughter’s team celebrates a one-, two- or six-year anniversary, Arevalo honors their achievement on social media.

There have been a lot of posts in the last year.

Dylan Elliott (two years), Samuel Elvington (three years), Shaun Jefferson (two years), Zoe Alessandra De Luca-Parker (two years), Andrea Deslauriers (three years) and Whitney Reed Mallett (five years) have all celebrated work anniversaries in the past seven months. Many more have already surpassed one year at Obstinate Daughter.

Arevalo started the tradition years ago when a server named Tifyane Tipton was nearing her five-year anniversary. The 29-year food and beverage industry veteran posted about Tipton’s milestone on social media. The rest is history.

“Before we started posting them on Instagram, we would have a calendar with milestones and birthdays posted up in the restaurant as a reminder of those special occasions,” Arevalo said. “Our No. 1 asset is our people. Celebrating milestones creates a culture of being valued.”

This culture starts at the top with owner Doug Godley, who provides employees with paid vacation and match a portion of their 401(k), among other benefits. Both Godley and Obstinate Daughter executive chef Jacques Larson say they hope to create the best possible work environment for all employees.

“Chefs and anyone in the industry, it’s expected that you work at least six days for at least 12 hours long. No other industry demands that you put in those kinds of hours,” Larson said. “People that do that don’t have employees holding signs.”

In May, bartender Lauren Drees will hold up a sign that reads “five years,” an anniversary she credits to the restaurant’s customers, commitment to the environment and her coworkers. The Pittsburgh native said she plans to stay put at Obstinate Daughter for a long time.

“There’s a really good rapport between front of the house and back of the house,” Drees said. “It just makes everything smoother when you feel like you can ask questions.”

Obstinate Daughter chef de cuisine Will D’Erasmo bought into the company culture after first meeting Godley and Larson at Wild Olive, their Johns Island restaurant that opened in 2009. There, D’Erasmo worked as a line cook for two years before joining Obstinate Daughter when it opened in 2014.

“At this point it’s kind of like my home because I’ve put so much time and energy into it. Doug is an extremely generous boss. He provides us with new equipment if we ask for it and things like that,” D’Erasmo said. “I enjoy the food and I like working with Jacques.”

Employment in South Carolina’s leisure and hospitality sector grew 2.2 percent from March to April, but Charleston area restaurateurs are still struggling with a staffing crisis that existed even before the COVID-19 pandemic. While Obstinate Daughter has a stable staff, there are days when the kitchen crew is short a member or two.

During those shifts, everyone chips in.

“The sheer volume that we’re doing, we’re blowing through food products,” D’Erasmo said. “It gets stressful and how to alleviate some of that stress is something we’re always thinking about.”

D’Erasmo motivates the back of the house by allowing chefs to move around the kitchen. “Tough love” was the norm early on in his career, but nowadays, he prefers a different mantra: A compliment can go a long way.

The opportunity to learn and earn more responsibilities in the kitchen has benefited executive sous chef Carlos Paredes, who joined Obstinate Daughter six years ago. On most nights, Paredes is in charge of coming up with the restaurant’s daily specials.

“The restaurant works completely different. If you’re working the line, you have to have a different set of skills,” Paredes said. “Nobody’s bored doing one station every time.”

Obstinate Daughter is a high-volume operation, so chefs who tire of the nighttime hours can join the morning prep team. The restaurant has been the ultimate training ground for Paredes, who is nearing the end of his tenure at Obstinate Daughter as he plans for the opening of his own restaurant in his home country of Peru.

Opening a restaurant has always been Paredes’ dream, but he was tempted by the thought of staying at Obstinate Daughter for as long as D’Erasmo and Larson would have him. As it stands, the chef will stay until the new restaurant is closer to its opening date.

“I think it’s definitely going to crush me,” Paredes said of leaving Obstinate Daughter. “I fell in love with the place. It actually make me find what I really want to be doing.”

Obstinate Daughter, located at 2063 Middle St., is open daily for lunch and dinner. For more information, visit theobstinatedaughter.com.

New legislation could increase enforcement of state ethics fines

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - This month, the state ethics commission updated its list of debtors which includes elected officials and candidates on the hook for late or missing filings, misuse of campaign funds and more.It’s about 25 pages long, listing people who owe $100 to hundreds of thousands, totaling $2.6 million.That’s about the same as when ...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - This month, the state ethics commission updated its list of debtors which includes elected officials and candidates on the hook for late or missing filings, misuse of campaign funds and more.

It’s about 25 pages long, listing people who owe $100 to hundreds of thousands, totaling $2.6 million.

That’s about the same as when Live 5 Investigates reported on the debtors three years ago.

Ethics Commission Debtor’s list continues to grow

The latest to be added from the Lowcountry area are Angela McClary-Rush, a board member for Williamsburg Council Schools, Chris Lovelace, a former Colleton County Sheriff candidate and Timothy Reese, a council member on Sullivan’s Island.

Many remain on that list months and years after being added because getting them to pay up, doesn’t always pay off for the South Carolina Ethics Commission.

That’s because the state agency lacks the enforcement it needs, according to Sen. Greg Hembree (R-District 28).

“When you don’t have that ability to enforce the law. Then you really undermine the entire integrity of the system,” he said.

The Commission is charged with keeping politicians honest by enforcing state elections laws.

“We were way ahead of the country back in when we first passed them. We were like the lead, they had the best ethics laws in the country for a long time, but other states have caught us and now have passed us,” Hembree said. “For someone who just wants to thumb their nose at the law they can.”

Live 5 spoke with former Charleston County District 20 Constituent School Board chairman Tony Lewis in 2018 to ask about $61,210 owed to the ethics commission. Then he said he didn’t have a problem with being held accountable.

He’s currently listed as owing $60,955, making about a $300 difference.

When Live 5 Investigates followed up, he did say he had been making some payments until the pandemic hit.

But had a different tone, calling the fines “hellacious price tag” in response to a question if he would resume payments.

Lewis no longer holds his position on the board.

Candidates in smaller races report less help and resources, but higher fines

Henry Copeland ran for Charleston County School board in 2012 and ended up owing the ethics commission $7,500 dollars. What began as an initial late fee of $100, ended up snowballing with daily late fees.

He’s now on a payment plan from the Department of Revenue.

“It was a shock in the sense that was far more than I ever spent on the election,” he said. “I think it was a very stiff fine considering the fact we were talking about a missing a filing deadline and we may be talking about reporting maybe $2,000 worth of campaign contributions, but the law is the law. But there ought to be some opportunity in which to rectify a situation that had apparently gone to the other extreme.”

Running a smaller campaign, Copeland recalls little to no support available to him from the state.

We were also able to get in contact with Chris Lovelace who according to the ethics commission owes $31,100 in fines for his 2016 run for Colleton County Sheriff.

Lovelace was just added to the list this past month.

The ethics commission reports he missed several filing deadlines and used campaign funds for personal reasons including gas station, restaurant, and clothing store charges.

Lovelace denies wrongdoing and argues health issues put him at a disadvantage.

“All the campaign funds are accounted for. It’s just that, they weren’t reported on time, at the time frame they wanted. And again, I take responsibility for that. It’s nobody else’s responsibility but mine. But I think the $30,000 is excessive,” he said. “As far as the Ethics Commission, dealing with them, it’s left a sour taste in my mouth.”

Lovelace says he ran because he saw corruption within the department and wanted to do something positive for his community.

He’s currently appealing his case.

Lewis also complained that he wasn’t aware of procedure, and it wasn’t fair to charge him for something he didn’t know about.

“The paperwork is so discouraging from that standpoint that I can easily see where an average person would hesitate to get involved. It places doubt on my desire to run for political office again, " Copeland said.

Banned from holding office

Legislation is in the works that would prevent Copeland and all the others named on the list from running from office again, at least as long as they owe money.

Sen. Hembree of the Peedee area introduced Senate Bill 991 that would prevent candidates with outstanding debts from doing so.

“There was one that we had in Horry County some years ago with a high profile elected official who happened to be a friend of mine, you know, but this person just for whatever reason we’re just steadfastly refused to pay those funds and they got into the tens of thousands of dollars,” Hembree said. “This person continued to serve continue to run for election and continue to get reelected so and still no payment of fine. So I was that was how I became aware of the problem.”

The bill did make it to a subcommittee but ultimately did not pass this legislative session.

Hembree says the bill wasn’t fully ready but he’s hopeful they’ll hit the ground running next year.

“I think that if you want a system, that’s truly accountable. They’re going to have to be more people at the Ethics Commission,” Copeland said. “But they’re going to have to have more of an eye on how to catch the items that can be corrected and how to catch the items that are an abuse of the system, and how to tell the difference between the two.”

The Ethics Commission receives funds from the legislature, but the $2.6 million owed is intended to help keep the department operating.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Loggerheads Continue To Lay Eggs By The Dozen

By Mary Pringle for The Island Eye NewsAt last, our loggerhead turtles have started to lay their eggs. As of May 26 the combined number of eggs laid is just over 550 on the Isle of Palms and 271 on Sullivan’s Island. The first of our six nests was laid on May 16 at 5th Avenue on the Isle of Palms and was discovered by Turtle Team members Jane Solomon, Peggy Klimecki and Trisha Hoff. It was laid at the high tide line in the middle of the vehicular access path at 5th Avenue. For those reasons, the 123 eggs were moved higher onto a...

By Mary Pringle for The Island Eye News

At last, our loggerhead turtles have started to lay their eggs. As of May 26 the combined number of eggs laid is just over 550 on the Isle of Palms and 271 on Sullivan’s Island. The first of our six nests was laid on May 16 at 5th Avenue on the Isle of Palms and was discovered by Turtle Team members Jane Solomon, Peggy Klimecki and Trisha Hoff. It was laid at the high tide line in the middle of the vehicular access path at 5th Avenue. For those reasons, the 123 eggs were moved higher onto a nearby dune where they would not be destroyed by the tide or emergency vehicles. Subsequent nests on the Isle of Palms have been laid at the 5A Access Path, the 9A Access Path and in Dewees Inlet near the 17 tee of the Links Golf Course. This fourth IOP nest is now incubating near the Property Owners’ Beach House in Wild Dunes. On Sullivan’s Island, the first nest was laid very close to the Breach Inlet Bridge at the Hunley Memorial Park. This is not even in the area where our volunteers patrol, but others reported seeing the tracks there on May 20. Those eggs were taken to Station 26 to be relocated.

This was an unusually large clutch of 156 eggs. The average number they lay is around 120 eggs. The second SI nest of the season was found near Station 15 not far from Fort Moultrie by Raye Ann Osborne and Joanne Staton on May 24. It is now incubating just northeast of the Station 16 Access Path. In South Carolina, the first nest of the season was laid at Lighthouse Island in the Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge where more loggerheads nest than anywhere north of Jacksonville, Florida.

As of May 26 there were 923 nests in our state. We are off to a good start and are looking forward to having a very good season. We are also protecting most of our nests from coyote predation with heavy plastic screening.

Here are season reminders that we would like everyone to be aware of to have a safe beach for our loggerheads in 2022:

• Lights Out at Dusk. Any lights that can be seen from the beach should be turned off from dusk to dawn between May 1 and Oct. 31. This is the law on both islands.

• Fill in Holes. Any hole on the beach can trap small hatchlings and also large nesting females.

• Turn off flashlights & don’t use flash photography. If you see a nesting turtle on the beach, stay back at least 50 feet and do not disturb her.

Report any stranded turtles, dead or alive, to (843) 697-8733 or (843) 886-6522. If it has orange paint on it, it has been documented and is awaiting burial. Follow the season at bergwerfgraphics.com or join us on Facebook at Island Turtle Team IOP & SI South Carolina.

Dominion Energy lists Sullivan’s Island Sand Dunes Club for sale with $19M offer in hand

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Dominion Energy hopes to sell the Sand Dunes Club to a company owned by local billionaire Ben Navarro for $19 million, with plans in place to make it a club for island residents and property owners.The historic beachfront venue was created in the 1950s after South Carolina Electric & Gas bought the 3.5 acres from the federal government for $27,000 as properties associated with Fort Moultrie were being sold.With a large clubhouse, swimming pool, tennis courts and direct beach access, it was us...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Dominion Energy hopes to sell the Sand Dunes Club to a company owned by local billionaire Ben Navarro for $19 million, with plans in place to make it a club for island residents and property owners.

The historic beachfront venue was created in the 1950s after South Carolina Electric & Gas bought the 3.5 acres from the federal government for $27,000 as properties associated with Fort Moultrie were being sold.

With a large clubhouse, swimming pool, tennis courts and direct beach access, it was used for decades as a corporate retreat, by island residents and rented out for events and meetings. Dominion Energy acquired the property when it bought SCE&G.

The energy company sought the state Public Service Commission’s permission to sell the property for $19 million to a subsidiary of Navarro’s Beemok Capital called SDCC Island Resident Club. In February the commission instead required Dominion list the property for sale and solicit bids.

“This simply means that Dominion Energy will need to determine whether other potential buyers exist,” said Rhonda Maree O’Banion, Dominion’s media relations manager.

“After the competitive bidding process is complete, Dominion Energy will report back to the commission and if necessary, update its request for approval to sell the Sand Dunes property,” she added.

The sale to Navarro’s company has been anticipated on Sullivan’s Island, a barrier island with fewer than 2,000 residents where the average home sale price in 2021 was nearly $3.2 million according to the Charleston Trident Association of Realtors.

One year ago the town signed an agreement with Navarro’s company that laid out plans to potentially renovate the club and operate it for island residents.

Beemok, the February 2021 agreement says, “desires to purchase the property from its current owner, renovate the clubhouse and operate the club.”

The agreement also says “the town believes a club with membership limited to town residents and property owners” would be desirable if the club were sold.

“That’s what we were expecting was going to happen,” Sullivan’s Island Mayor Patrick O’Neil said. “Mr. Navarro and his group have worked closely with the town.”

The agreement is non-exclusive and the same conditions apply to the property regardless of who were to buy it, he said.

The agreement says the price of membership in the club would not exceed the cost of operating the club, and the town would get to review confidential financial statements to ensure that provision.

Residents and town property owners could become members, and nonmembers could still use the pool for a fee comparable to what municipal recreation departments charge in Mount Pleasant or on Isle of Palms, the agreement says.

The address is considered a large property that’s most valuable as a potential site for new homes according to an appraisal submitted by Dominion, but the clubhouse is protected as an historic structure and could not be demolished without the town’s permission.

The property would not be the first iconic Charleston-area locale purchased by Navarro’s companies if his bid is successful. His companies own the Charleston Place hotel, purchased last year for $350 million, and the Credit One Bank Stadium on Daniel Island.

Efforts to reach representatives of Beemok Capital and the company’s public relations firm by phone and email were unsuccessful Friday.

The sale of the property would not change Dominion Energy’s utility rates or pricing according to the company’s Public Service Commission filing.

In 2021 Dominion turned over more than 2,900 acres of property as part of a $165 million tax settlement with the S.C. Department of Revenue, resolving a three-year dispute over taxes owed on parts and materials purchased to build the V.C. Summer nuclear plant, which was not completed. The Sand Dunes Club was not a part of that deal, but other former clubs and retreats in Aiken, Lexington and Georgetown counties were, and some of those will be added to the state’s park system.

Brian Symmes, spokesman for Gov. Henry McMaster’s office, said the state had been interested in the Sand Dunes Club property, but the cost was too high.

“There was interest in it being part of the settlement agreement, but at the end of the day it was just much too expensive,” he said.

The more than 2,900 acres South Carolina acquired, which included the Pine Island Club on Lake Murray, cost the state about $50 million — the amount Dominion’s tax debt was reduced in exchange for those properties. The Sand Dunes Club property, less than 4 acres, would presumably have cost at least the $19 million Beemok Capital has offered, and make for an unusually expensive park purchase.

The tax settlement was a part of the relief provided to ratepayers, shareholders and governments who sued after Dominion’s predecessor SCE&G abruptly ended construction at the V.C. Summer site in 2017.

New Sullivan’s Island restaurant will focus on fresh fish with a side of nostalgia

Restaurants tend to stick around for a long time on Sullivan’s Island.Dunleavy’s Pub turns 30 this year and Poe’s Tavern is on the brink of its 20-year anniversary. In recent years, newer Sullivan’s Island establishments like The Obstinate Daughter, The Co-Op, Home Team BBQ and Mex 1 Coastal Cantina have gained a following that spans the entire Charleston area.When a longtime eating and drinking establishment is forced to close on the island, it’s not required to pay homage to the previous owners, ...

Restaurants tend to stick around for a long time on Sullivan’s Island.

Dunleavy’s Pub turns 30 this year and Poe’s Tavern is on the brink of its 20-year anniversary. In recent years, newer Sullivan’s Island establishments like The Obstinate Daughter, The Co-Op, Home Team BBQ and Mex 1 Coastal Cantina have gained a following that spans the entire Charleston area.

When a longtime eating and drinking establishment is forced to close on the island, it’s not required to pay homage to the previous owners, but it’s not uncommon.

Take Home Team BBQ, which opened on Sullivan’s Island 13 years ago in the space once occupied by Bert’s Pharmacy and Bert’s Bar at 2209 Middle St.

Home Team still utilizes the bar Bert Wurthmann constructed when he converted half of his pharmacy into the beloved Bert’s Bar that served the island until 2007. Island residents who visit Home Team likely recognize Wurthmann in the black-and-white photographs hanging near its entrance today, honoring the building’s historical significance as a social hub for those who lived nearby.

Steps away at 2019 Middle St., the home of forthcoming restaurant Sullivan’s Fish Camp, owners Ben and Kate Towill also plan to connect guests to the building’s previous life while introducing a contemporary concept fit for the future.

When Sullivan’s Fish Camp opens in April, patrons will notice markers hinting at the 32 years of work Sammy Rhodes and Donna Rhodes Hiott put into the space as owners of Sullivan’s Seafood Restaurant, which closed on Sept. 6, 2020.

For those who frequented the landmark eatery, entering Sullivan’s Fish Camp will feel like stepping into a place that feels familiar and totally different all at once.

That’s the goal the Towills set forth when they took over the iconic building: To honor the last 30-plus years and help the new restaurant earn the same longevity its predecessor and many of its neighbors achieved.

“That was really important to us, this idea of carrying this on and them passing the torch and us to check in with them through that,” said Ben, adding that the couple has been by to express their full support of the new endeavor. “We just keep trying to think back to those places but then doing a very contemporary version of that.”

The Towills are the owners of design and hospitality firm Basic Projects. Kate, head of design for the Charleston-based company, has led the design of residential and commercial properties, including an athletic club and Basic Projects’ two other restaurants: Basic Kitchen and Post House.

Alongside her husband, Basic Projects head of operations Eva Suarez and other members of the team, Kate led the two-year renovation of Sullivan’s Fish Camp, where she set out to create a 1970s-inspired beachside aesthetic.

A local hand contributed to nearly every element of the restaurant, from the potted plants native to the island that separate the outdoor patio from the road to an old English pub-style sign hanging outside the restaurant made by Sullivan’s Island resident Mickey Williams.

Inside, vintage pieces Kate collected over the last two years cover the walls along with elements honoring Sullivan’s Seafood, like a framed flag and original menu. Windows were added to the left side of the restaurant, where patrons will soon sit in booths that feature lamp shades adorned with nautical maps of Sullivan’s Island.

On the right side of the restaurant is the restored bar area, highlighted by the original wood paneling that covered Sullivan’s for three decades. Hanging above the bar are two billiard lamps reading “Sullivan’s Fish Camp” that were made by North Charleston’s Charlestowne Stained Glass Studio.

“I couldn’t find the size and the look I wanted, so I found this local guy in North Charleston,” said Kate, who asked if he could recreate her vision for vintage hanging lights. “He was like, ‘I haven’t done anything like that since the ‘70s.’ And I was like, ‘Precisely, that’s what we need.’ ”

Behind the bar, Sullivan’s Fish Camp bar manager Jordan Moton will serve local beer, easy drinking wines and refreshing cocktails, such as a frozen paloma on tap.

Isle of Palms-born executive chef Davis Hood will lead the Sullivan’s Fish Camp kitchen with plans to offer a refined, local take on the casual fare you would expect to find at a beachfront restaurant — fried seafood baskets, oysters, crudos, a lobster roll, wedge salad with green goddess dressing, spicy fried chicken sandwich and key lime pie (a Sullivan’s Seafood staple).

Hood and his brother Nathan — who recently transitioned from Post House executive chef to culinary director of Basic Projects — used to visit the original Sullivan’s for birthday parties, so the restaurant is near and dear to their family’s heart.

“It’s sort of come full circle,” Ben said. “He knows this place and knows the area.”

Hood’s menu will be broken up into three parts: Raw bites, cooked starters, entrees and sweets. Large-format seafood towers named First Jetty and Second Jetty hint at Hood’s days of jumping off the jetties as a kid nearby on the Isle of Palms.

“He’s a super playful personality,” Suarez said. “I feel like that really comes through with how he’s written the menu.”

Ice cream scoops, sandwiches and other beach bites will be available at the front of the restaurant, where Sullivan’s Fish Camp-branded merchandise made by Stitch Design Co. — such as beach totes, hats and bottle openers — will be available for purchase.

The Towills hope to win over the many who likely still hit the beach wearing Sullivan’s Seafood Restaurant garb.

Perhaps they’ll soon add Sullivan’s Fish Camp apparel to their collection.

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